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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 164
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 164. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2371.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 164. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2371

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 164, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2371.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 164
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_182.jpg
Transcript l64 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. uninjured, and the walls and outlines of the chapel can be distinctly traced. Of the history of this most remarkable ruin very little is known. Jerome mentions a monastery at Gilgal, and it is said to have been two miles from the Jordan, which would sufficiently describe this site. It appears to have been occupied three hundred and fifty years ago by monks of the order of St. Basil, and was then called the monastery of St. Jerome. From that period we find no mention of it, nor any record of its being inhabited by a religious order, and it was a ruin pretty much in its present condition when visited by Seetzen at the beginning of this century. Jt was probably held by the monks during the Middle Ages as a place of refuge for the Jordan pilgrims, and became deserted when the caravans were placed under escort and protection. From Kasr Hajla a ride of three-quarters of an hour brings us on a desolate expanse of grey salt mud, with occasional sand mounds burrowed by the jerboa, to the mouth of the Jordan, without a living tree to enliven it, but with many a bare bark-stripped trunk projecting out of the slime, on the naked boughs of which many kingfishers and an occasional cormorant perch to watch for their helpless prey, the fishes with which the river teems, and which incautiously swimming down the stream become stupified as soon as they enter the brine. In dry weather the grey mud is encrusted with salt and gypsum, and occasional layers of sulphur and oxide of iron. No wonder that Flora declines to display life on such a soil. But whenever a little sand-mound has collected, there a few desert shrubs plant their roots and relieve the monotony. The river itself lies completely out of sight. Never except from some commanding height can a glimpse be caught of the silvery bead which marks its course until within two or three miles of its end when its forest fringe ceases. But its course can everywhere be traced by the deep green ribbon of foliage just peering above the upper banks, the tops of the trees which guard its border. All along this lower plain there are three sets of terrace banks. The old bed of the river, or rather the upper end of the lake, where the mud deposits were laid against the slopes of the enclosing mountains, was about sixteen miles wide. This is the plain on which Jericho, Beth Hogla, and Gilgal stood. Then we have the higher plain, which even now on rare occasions is flooded. This is covered with shrubs and scant herbage. Then close to the river's bank we descend fifty-five feet into a dense thicket of tamarisk, silver poplar, willows, terebinth, and many other trees strange to European eyes, with a dense and impenetrable undergrowth of reed and all sorts of aquatic brushwood. This is perforated in all directions by the runs of wild boars, which literally swarm here, while the branches are vocal with myriads of birds—nightingales, bulbuls, and especially turtle-doves —which meet here and find abundant food in the herbage of the trefoil, astragalus, and other characteristic plants of the higher plain. In ancient times beasts more formidable than the wild boar had their lair in these coverts, and when driven out by the periodical swellings of Jordan the lion and the leopard sought their prey among the flocks of the villagers in the country above. The leopard still lingers in these thickets, and an observant traveller cannot explore far without coming on its traces, especially on the east bank. But the lion, though not extinct in the times of the Crusades, has long been exterminated from the region west of the