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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 161
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 161. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 161. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2368

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 161, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 161
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_179.jpg
Transcript ^■■■■^■■■■■■j SITE OF SODOM AND GOMORRAH. 161 would enable a spectator to identify the region whence the smoke arose, which he could not do if it had been at the lower end. Again, in the account of the inroad of Chedorlaomer, we read that the invaders returning from Mount Seir smote the Amorites in Hazezon Tamar, and then were met by the King of Sodom and his confederates in the plains of Siddim, and were pursued by Abraham to the sources of the Jordan. This could not have been if Sodom and the other cities had been at the south end. Lastly, in the view granted to Moses from Pisgah, "he beheld the south and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the City of Palm-trees, unto Zoar." From Nebo it is utterly impossible to see the south-east of the Dead Sea, the modern Dra'a, supposed to be Zoar; but if Zoar were somewhere on the lower slopes below the Moabite range the description is perfectly natural. One very careful explorer (Lieut. Conder, R.E.), suggests Wady Amriyeh, near Ain Feshkhah, at the north-west shoulder of the Dead Sea, as radically identical in its name with Gomorrah, and near a great and plenteous spring. He suggests El Damieh, near Surtabeh, twenty-three miles higher up the valley, as pointing to the city Adam, which he identifies with Admah. Shaht ed Duba'a, i.e. the lair of the hyena, the cliff just above Roman Jericho, he suggests as answering to Zeboim, i.e. hyenas. We believe that the true topography is that which would place Sodom and Gomorrah in the wide eastern stretch of the plains of Jordan, in front of the wide plains of Shittim, and perhaps rather to the south of them, though possibly they may have been on the western side. But Zoar certainly was on the east side, and it seems more in accordance with the incidents of the narrative to place all the cities on the same side of Jordan, and probably at no great distance from each other. Of Admah we have no trace, though it has been conjecturally identified with the city " Adam," near Zarthan, in the plain of Succoth, some way higher up and too far to harmonize well with the narrative. Now one remarkable feature of this " Ciccar," or plain of Jordan, is the number of Tells, or barren artificial mounds, which stud it on both sides. They recall to the traveller the artificial mounds on which the villages of Egypt are planted to save them from inundation. They are unquestionably artificial, for in all which have been examined fragments of pottery and traces of sun-dried and frequently kiln-burnt bricks are found. In some, too, fragments of columns and dressed stones may be seen. Very probably some of these nameless heaps may mark the exact site of the doomed cities. Dr. Merrill has recently with much ingenuity suggested five sites on the Shittim plain, to all of which names are attached by the Arabs. Zoar he identifies with the southernmost mound, Tell Ektana (from the Hebrew katan, " little" ?), and probably M'Shaggar, a spur in front of Nebo, sheltered the little city. Zeboim is placed about seven miles north-west of this at Tell Shaib, and the others at Tell Kefrein, opposite the upper ford (Abel-Shittim), at Tell Ramah, and Seweimeh, or Beth Jesimoth. But we can scarcely expect an unquestioned identification for any one excepting Zoar, which remained to after-times, and to which the allusions are so clear as to shut us up to the little corner close under the Moab Mountains for our investigation. But we have lingered long enough over these faint traces of all but prehistoric cities. 22