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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 160
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 160. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 160. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2366

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 160, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 160
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_177.jpg
Transcript i6o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and depressed position. In the second place, the simple narrative of Genesis states that "the Lord rained brimstone and fire out of heaven, and overthrew those cities .... and that which grew upon the ground." There is no authority whatever in the biblical record for the popular notion that the site of the cities was submerged. The simple and natural explanation seems, when stripped of all the wild tradition and strange horrors with which the mysterious sea has been invested, to be this—that during some earthquake, or without its direct agency, showers of sulphur and probably bitumen ejected from the lake or thrown up from its shores, and ignited perhaps by the lightning which would accompany such phenomena, fell upon the cities and destroyed them. The materials for such a catastrophe do exist. Sulphur springs stud the shore. Sulphur is strewn, whether in layers or in fragments, over the desolate plains, and bitumen is ejected in great floating masses from the bottom of the sea, oozes through the fissures of the rocks, is deposited with gravel on the beach, or in places appears to have been precipitated during some convulsion. During the great earthquake of January, 1837, whole islets of bitumen were suddenly detached and floated on the surface. The kindling by lightning of such a mass of combustible material, which in those times must have existed in at least as great abundance as at present, combined with an earthquake ejecting it from the lake, would soon spread devastation over the plain, so that the smoke of the country would go up as the smoke of a furnace. The history of the catastrophe has not only remained in the inspired record, but is inscribed in the memory of the surrounding tribes by many a local tradition and significant name. But as there is no warrant for imagining that the catastrophe was a geological one, so in any other case all traces of action must at this distance of time have vanished. The configuration of the sea-bottom shows that no cities can possibly have existed and been submerged except in the lagoon at the southern end. There are only two possible localities for the doomed cities, either near the southern or near the northern end of the lake. Modern writers have until recently assumed the neighbourhood of the lower end as a matter of course, from the tradition given by Josephus, from the similarity of some names, as Usdum, supposed to represent Soil mi, and chiefly because Jerome identifies a Zoar at the south-eastern end of the Dead Sea with the Zoar of Genesis. But on the other hand they are called "the Cities of the Plain." " Ctccar" is the circle of Jordan, and used only of the district north of the lake. We read that Abraham and Lot stood together between Bethel and Ai and beheld all the plains of Jordan, and Lot chose the well-watered region of Sodom and Gomorrah. From the hill between Bethel and Ai it is utterly impossible to see the lower end of the sea, sixty miles distant, and shut out by intervening hills, while the plain of Jericho is spread almost at the beholder's feet, and the bright green oasis of Ain Sultan shines like an emerald on the dreary waste. What must it have been when the old region was well watered everywhere, " even as the garden of the Lord." Again, after the destruction of the cities, Abraham looked from Mamre "toward Sodom and Gomorrah, and, lo, the smoke of the country went up as the smoke of a furnace." From Mamre the plain itself is not visible, but the depression between the hills I