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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 157
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 157. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2363.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 157. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2363

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 157, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2363.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 157
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_174.jpg
Transcript THE DEAD SEA. I57 rocks from beneath and pouring them forth in lava floods, may have caused the sudden subsidence along the axis of the valley. But after it was formed it was long before the Dead Sea became reduced to its present level. The history of its gradual subsidence is written on the western slopes, not only of the sea itself, but on those of the valley as far as Kurn Surtabeh, nearly half-way to the Lake of Galilee. The eastern side is far too steep to allow any deposits to remain ; but on the opposite side, and especially up the valleys which debouch on the plain, there are white deposits of chalky marl and gypsum strongly impregnated with salt, so that not the slightest vegetation can exist. These raised beaches have been left when the sea was double its present extent, and are four hundred feet above the present level. About two hundred feet lower down are the marks of a second coast-line, and a third former boundary of the lake is marked by another set of flat shelves of marl about a hundred feet above the present surface. Again, about seventy feet lower may be traced, especially at the south end, the register of another long pause in its subsidence before the lake became reduced to its present contracted limits. In historic times there is no evidence of the extent of the sea having varied much. True, it rises and falls a few feet—perhaps within the limits of four feet—at different seasons of the year; but taking one year with another its bulk appears to be almost stationary. Perhaps the supply scarcely keeps pace with the exhaustion by evaporation; but had it been much higher, for instance in the times of Joshua, the sites of Beth Hogla and Gilgal could scarcely have been habitable. At either end of the lake are wide level plains of several miles in extent, that at the south end being absolute desolation. For about seven or eight miles it is scarcely above the winter level of the water, and is sometimes overflowed, while both the soil and the waters of the several streams which drain the Arabah are so saturated with mineral salts that even marine vegetable life is impossible. But the moment we rise even three feet above this plain the vegetation, nourished by the abundant springs and rills from the eastern mountains, becomes dense and luxuriant, as in the Ghor Safieh, at the south-eastern corner of the lake. The northern plain, or Ghor, as it is called—the " Ciccar" of the Hebrews—though barren, is by no means so utterly lifeless, and on the east side the desert portion forms but a narrow fringe. The reason of this is the higher level of the northern plain. When we return to the north end of the lake, we find the flat shores strewn for several hundred yards from the water's edge with the gaunt trunks and branches of palms, tamarisks, and smaller trees carried down by the winter floods, and then cast on shore denuded of their bark, bleached and incrusted with salt, and by their grim skeleton appearance most suggestive of the name Dead Sea. It is on this northern plain of Ghor that it seems certain we must place the sites of the Cities of the Plain, " suffering the vengeance of eternal fire." Much labour and ingenuity has been exhausted on the question of their situation. Before arriving at a definite conclusion it may be as well to clear the ground by some general observations. In the first place, it has been frequently assumed that the destruction of Sodom and its sister cities was the result of some