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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 156
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 156. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 156. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2362

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 156, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 156
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_173.jpg
Transcript i56 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and then the little lake four miles long. Its next halt is at the hallowed Lake of Galilee ' hundred and eighty-two feet below the Mediterranean, whence it pursues a tortuous cou within narrow limits for a direct distance of sixty-five miles to the north end of the Dead.Se It has no outlet, and the volume of water constantly poured into it from the Jordan and th rivers of Moab, as well as by the torrents on the west side and southern end, is carried off simply by evaporation. This alone in the case of a lake without exit would be sufficient to account for its saltness, for the saline particles carried down in solution are not evaporated, but remain, and by their continual additions add to the saltness of the stagnant water. Hence all such lakes are invariably salt. But in this case there is an additional cause in the vast salt deposit several miles long at the south end, Jebel Usdum, past which little streams flow into the sea, bringing fresh supplies of brine. Not only in the depression of its surface below the sea-level, but also in the enormous depth of its water the Dead Sea is unique among lakes. Its greatest depth near the north end is one thousand three hundred and eight feet, and close to the Moab shore it descends sheer for nine hundred feet. The southern portion, on the contrary, on the other side of the Lisan, is only about twelve feet deep. The extraordinary perpendicular depth on the east side is explained by the geological causes which have formed the whole fissure. Volcanic agency has only indirectly been at work, but at some recent geologic epoch, subsequent to the formation of the chalk, but before the eocene, there must have been a sudden and immense crack, dislocating the whole stratification. In fact, the bed of the valley must have fallen towards the centre of the earth, with line of dislocation along the eastern edge. This is shown by the entire change of the geological formation east and west of the Jordan. On the east side we have the new red sandstone, and hard limestone of the age of our greensand above it; while apparently on the top of the red sandstone at the south of the lake on its western side lies the great deposit of rock-salt, such as is found on our new red sandstone in England. These sandstone beds are but slightly inclined, and rise abruptly. On the west side, on the contrary, the red sandstone is never found, but we have soft strata of the chalk and eocene periods, dipping with many faults from west to east, and often strangely contorted. Hence they must have been deposited previous to the dislocation. But on the top of this chalk there remains on the tops of the hills an eocene deposit, very rich in fossils, and which, though washed out of the valleys, yet remains undisturbed elsewhere, and which has no eastward dip. At this period the sea must have rolled over the whole of Syria south of the Lebanon, and probably (though this is not clear) over the ridge of Akabah to the Red Sea. Subsequent to the formation of the Jordan valley appears to have been the great volcanic period, when streams of lava overflowed the whole of the Ledjah and Haura (Trachonitis and Bashan), and covered a large portion of the country west of the Sea o Galilee, and as far south as Gilboa, with many eruptions in the east of Moab, none of u 1C exhibit signs of being waterworn. Still there may have been many earlier epochs of volcanic activity, and the region has always been bituminous, as may be seen by the deposi s streaks of bitumen in the chalk rocks. These volcanic eruptions, draining out the mo te