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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 154
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 154. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2360.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 154. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2360

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 154, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2360.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 154
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_171.jpg
Transcript 154 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. In the rocks of this Kedron valley the curious little Syrian hyrax, the coney of Script abounds ; and little miniature porcupines, true mice, but with the covering of a hedp-eh instead of fur, may be seen nibbling among the brown brushwood. Everything is taw The Greek partridge gives place to the desert sand partridge ; the hare is of the same russ hue ; the foxes, the larks, everything that moves, are of the same uniform fawn colour rarelv with the least variation in shade. The only exceptions are a few chats, birds of bright black- and-white livery, which seek their safety not in flight or concealment, but in the fissures of the rocks. The foliage and the blossoms of most of the plants are alike, a brownish yellow or a yellowish white. The beetles alone of living things, apparently for the convenience of the birds which feed on them, retain their bright and conspicuously coloured liveries. One of the most impressive views of the Dead Sea, at least of its northern part, is obtained by following the crest of this " Valley of Fire" to the edge of the precipitous wall where it enters the Dead Sea. From the top of the fissure a wide plain pushing out in several gracefully sweeping sandspits into the sea can be seen spread below, and at this distance does not reveal its barrenness. A strange conical hill, like a colossal cairn, stands isolated in the centre of the plain, a relic of the deposit which once filled the valley. The view of the coast-line is uninterrupted nearly to Engedi. A dark rich belt of tall cane brake fringes the plain twelve hundred feet beneath us, from headland to headland. The eye can trace the line of the eastern mountains, parallel to the hills of Judeea, almost from Mount Gilead to Kerak. The red ridge of Moab, with the sun casting purple shadows here and there, and patches of bright light on its level summits, is furrowed by the deep ravines of the Callirrhoe and the Arnon; while below the sea lies unruffled, blue and glossy, shining like oil, with here and there long streaks of what may be froth or ripple in narrow bands across it. Southward may be detected the Lisan (or tongue), a broad flat peninsula of barren marl, which stretches almost across the southern part of the lake. From these hills it looks like a narrow sandspit dovetailing with the wavy outlines of one low spit after another running out to meet it from the western shore. These white spits all sparkle and glitter in the sunlight like diamonds studded over a field of silver. Perhaps it is by moonlight that that silent mysterious lake is most impressive. It is a long weary scramble from the ridge down to the shore, and horses must be carefully led down the passes, which are only fit for goats, i.e. if the route be taken from Mar Saba, for down to Jericho from Jerusalem the road is easy and good. When a full moon rises, the eastern hills, which gleamed so warm a glow before sunset, are shrouded in gloom, and the moons radiance shoots over the burnished surface of the lake. There is a stillness that may be felt. Rarely does the wandering Bedouin visit these shores by day, and never by night, lne Dead Sea has often been described and still more often been the subject of romance. But let us put aside all preconceived notions, and so long as we do not try to drink it or rub it in our eyes, we shall find a centre of landscape of rare beauty and endless variety. True tner is no life, animal or vegetable, within its acrid waters; true that for the like reason