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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 148
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 148. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 148. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2353

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 148, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 148
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_164.jpg
Transcript IS 8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. wilderness, or from the Frank Mountain, skirting the Wady Nar (Valley of Fire), which the channel of the Kedron to the Dead Sea, or from the north end of the Dead Sea up a pass by Ras Feshkhah. Whichever route is taken the country is bare, wild, and desolate. The most difficult, but certainly the finest, is that from the Dead Sea, where, soon after reaching the Wady, the whole of the buttresses and towers of the convent come suddenly into view, clustered upon the steep face of the precipitous cliffs, and covering them from top to bottom (see page 158). A strong wall clings to the side of the rocks the whole way down, effectually protecting the place from any sudden surprise of the Bedouin. From the dry torrent- bed of the ravine flights of steps are cut, leading some to a carefully protected postern, others to the plateau above. The entrance by which travellers are received is marked by a large tower with dilapidated battlements, commanding from its summit a wide prospect, and on which there is always kept a careful look-out. But the feature which at once strikes the eye is the cluster of massive buttresses, reaching by steps from the top of the lower wall far up the face of the valley, five of them parallel and close together, while patches of green and the tops of trees peep from behind them in bright contrast to the weird surroundings. These buttresses support the platform on which the greater part of the monastery stands. A little iron-barred door is the entrance, where travellers must present their credentials before admission, and where they are carefully scrutinised by the janitor. No Bedouin or ladies are admitted on any pretext, the former for fear of treachery—of which St. Saba's history affords many instances— the latter by the rules of the order. But for their reception a tower outside is provided, where they are supplied with simple fare and a night's lodging. From the iron gate a flight of steps descends to a second door, thence another to a courtyard with miniature garden, and a third stair leads to the guest chamber. The terraces are clustered one over another, or by the side of each other, much after the fashion of a colony of swallows' nests. In fact, the architecture of this bird seems to have supplied the type for their construction. Fig-trees peep from many a corner, and there is one solitary palm, watered and tended with great veneration, and said to have been planted by St. Saba, and to have borne fruit the day after he planted it (see page 153). The monks affirm that the dates have no stones, but we were not supplied with any proof of this phenomenon. In the largest court is the dome of the sanctuary, where the bones of St. Saba once rested till they were removed to Venice, and near it the Chapel of St. Nicholas, the church of the convent, with the area of the nave open, surrounded with stalls, and the walls, screen, and chancel gorgeous with gilding and paintings, chiefly gifts from the Russian Emperor, who not many years since renovated the buildings. Behind is a dark cave covered with pictures, whose silver casings gleam in the dim obscurity, and behind a grating we are shown the skulls and bones of the martyrs, said to have been fourteen thousand in number, massacred by Chosroes, the Persian invader, in the beginning of the seventh century. The grotto is also shown where St. Saba lived and died, consisting of two chambers, which tradition says he shared peaceably with a lion, who was the original tenant. Three times the lion ejected the saint, but he obstinately returned, and at length the lion