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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 146
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 146. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 146. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 146, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 146
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_162.jpg
Transcript /-^ I46 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Dreamers," perhaps the very spot where David suddenly surprised the sleeping body-guard of Saul. From Hachilah he went to the wilderness of Maon, Nabal's home, which can easily be seen from Ziph, as can the great crusading town which marks the Carmel where Nabal had his flocks and herds. Lieut. Conder further suggests a deep gorge, " the valley of the rocks," between Maon and El Kolah, as the "cliff of division," as the scene of David's last interview with Saul, when he had taken his spear and cruse of water from beside his bolster. There is no other place in the neighbourhood which would meet the requirements of the history, and the chasm here is very narrow and absolutely impassable except by a detour of several miles. We have thus brought before us as in a panorama, which may be seen from the top of a single hill (Cain) east of Ziph, the whole scenery of David's flight and Saul's pursuit. The traditional Cave of Adullam, or Khureitun, which has been already described (see page 147), is the most remarkable for its size, and the least changed from its original form of any of those caverns which are among the peculiar features of this country of limestone hills. The ancient Jews do not appear to have used the caves generally as dwellings, though in Palestine, as over all the rest of the world, we find traces of primitive man in the prehistoric period leading a troglodyte life. The predecessors of the Canaanites, the Horites, or "cavemen" (Deut. ii. 12), though in the Scripture texts specially spoken of as the aborigines of Edom—where still their excavated dwellings are to be found by hundreds—yet evidently extended to the south of Palestine. The Emim and Rephaim, who existed down to the time of Abraham east of Jordan, seem to have been of the same race. Their successors did not altogether abandon cave dwellings, for in the south of Judah, and even in the north, as at Endor in Galilee, we find many villages in which the caves in the hillsides have manifestly served for the store-rooms or inner chambers of the houses built out in front. But the principal use to which they were applied by the Israelites was that of tombs. The Jewish mode of sepulture was doubtless suggested by the vast number of caves, which, though common enough in all soft limestone formations, yet in this country, so universally hilly without being mountainous, seamed in every direction with little water-worn valleys, abound as in no other region. Land, too, was very precious. " God's acre " was unknown, yet nowhere were the resting-places of the dead held in greater respect. Poor indeed must have been that family which could not secure at least a portion of some rock-hewn chamber for a family burying-place. From Abraham to Joseph of Arimathea the custom remained unchanged. Rachel and Joseph are among the rare exceptions where the grave was not hewn out of the rock. So universal was the custom, that it is hardly possible to explore a cave in any part of this land without finding traces of its having once been a place of sepulture. But after the second captivity we find the caves put to another use. When in the third and fourth centuries the fashion of a hermit life took root in Palestine, the disused sleeping- places of the dead became the homes of the living. A refuge adopted at first, perhaps, from necessity or for security, became an established type of dwelling; and he could hardly expect