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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 142
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 142. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 142. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2349

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 142, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 142
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_160.jpg
Transcript 142 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. cell or laura of hermits on the spot, and himself died in the cavern which he had made his home. Before reaching the cave the open valley becomes a narrow fissure, several hundred feet deep, with rugged precipitous sides, and the bottom strewn with massive fragments of rock. Altogether there is a strange seclusion and wildness about the spot. The only access to the cavern is along a narrow ledge high up above the bottom of the ravine. A fragment of rock lodged on the edge almost bars the entrance. On climbing over this we enter a narrow low passage leading to a small cave, from which a winding gallery leads to the great cave, a natural grotto one hundred and twenty feet long by forty feet wide, probably the largest in Palestine. When candles are lighted the disturbed bats flutter out in myriads, dashing against the face of the intruders and soon extinguishing any unprotected light. Numbers of narrow passages branch out in all directions, often leading to chambers, some of which are partially artificial; one of the passages is one hundred feet long. Niches are frequently cut in the inner chambers, and fragments of urns and sarcophagi tell us that the dead as well as the living found shelter here. Through some of the caverns there are steep descents into a lower series of chambers, and a second cavern of considerable extent. Even in this land of caves, that of Khureitun is remarkable, if not unique. It seems to have been formed originally by water action eating away the soft limestone. It is now commonly but incorrectly spoken of as the Cave of Adullam. But this tradition only dates back to the time of the Crusades, and no doubt, as far as space for four hundred men and security of position are concerned, it would meet all the requisite conditions. But it will not meet the topographical necessities, and the early Christians had a far more accurate tradition that the cave was west of Bethlehem, on the frontier of Philistia, in the valley of Elah, in accordance with the statement of Josephus that it was near the royal city of Adullam, on the west side of the central range. This has been rescued from oblivion by Mons. Ganneau, corroborated by the officers of the Palestine Exploration Fund, at Ed el Miye, in the low hills between Bethlehem and Gath, a strong natural position with good water supply and ancient tombs, and especially with a great number of habitable caves in the face of the hillside, amply sufficient for the accommodation of David and his men. Fond as the shepherds and inhabitants of Palestine are of dwellings in the rock, they always eschew the dark large caverns like those of Khureitun. The darkness, dampness, oppressive atmosphere, and the swarms of scorpions and bats are quite enough to prevent their use as ordinary dwellings. The marvels, then, of Khureitun can no longer be maintained to be historical as well as natural. From Khureitun, half an hour's ride brings us to the foot of Jebel Fureidis, the Herodium of Josephus, the Frank Mountain of later history. But what is the history of this lone fortress ? Its earliest certain name, Herodium, was given it by the great Idumaean, who, after he had defeated the party of Antigonus on this spot, raised a great castle, as we are told by Josephus, with massive fortifications. Within was the royal palace, of great strength and splendour, combining luxury with security. At the foot of the hill he also built splendid edifices for himself and his friends, and conveyed the