Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 141
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 141. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 141. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 141, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 141
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_159.jpg
Transcript SOLOMON'S POOLS. 14 x Roman work, and are the very aqueducts referred to by Josephus as being built by Pontius Pilate, who used for that purpose the moneys brought into the Temple treasury as " corban." But however this may be, the pools are undoubtedly of great antiquity, and the knowledge shown of the principle of the rise and fall of water when conveyed in pipes does not look like merely Roman engineering. It is difficult to understand how the Rabbis of the Mishna should have stated that Solomon made gardens at Etham, and conveyed the waters thence to Jerusalem, if there had been no such provision till the time of Pontius Pilate. It seems far more reasonable to suppose that during the many wars which desolated the land the original aqueducts were broken and were repaired at different times; and this at once accounts for the great difference in the style cf the masonry in various parts. If it be objected that we find no mention anywhere of the pools being constructed by Solomon, it may be replied that neither do we have anywhere any record of the epoch of the erection of the Haram of Hebron, which is undoubtedly ancient, and neither have we any statement that Pilate made the pools. They are so much more remarkable a work than the aqueduct, that admitting he either repaired or made a new aqueduct, it is difficult to believe that the pools themselves should not have been recorded as his work ; and if not here, where else could have been the aqueducts by which Solomon supplied the Temple with water ? The roofing of portions of the work with half-developed arches and the style of much of the aqueduct near Jerusalem are far more antique than the Roman, and we prefer to believe, and to enjoy the belief as we sit under the shade of the Castle of El Burak, that the huge cisterns before us are, at least in the portion hewn out of the rock, the work of the great king, and that though repaired and restored by Herod.ian and Roman hands from time to time, they are in their main features a veritable relic of the peaceful glories of the great Israelite kingdom. Broken aqueducts are throughout the whole of Palestine the most striking relics of departed wealth and fertility. They occur just in the most unexpected and now most desolate and barren tracts. We see how they spanned, again and again, the sublime gorges between Jerusalem and Quarantania; we find traces of them at Engedi; they still mark at intervals some of the most dreary spaces of the Judaean wilderness ; and, strangest of all, in the wadies at the south-west corner of the Dead Sea, in the Wady Mahawat, Zuweirah, and others, we find traces of carefully cemented aqueducts which once supplied cisterns which still stand ready, waiting but for the return of peace and security to make that desolate land once more a land flowing with milk and honey. To the east of the Pools of Solomon are several sites of interest. We pursue a track to the south-west, leaving on our left a conspicuous sugar-loaf hill which must be visited on our return, and after scrambling up a rugged little ravine without cultivation, on the brow of a long- backed hill about an hour and a half from El Burak, come to a confused mass of crumbling walls, presiding over earth-covered mounds of rubbish —Tekua, the ancient Tekoa. Just north of Tekoa, intervening between it and the tall peak of Frank Mountain, is a rough ravine or valley, the Wady Khureitun, so named from a hermit, St. Chariton, in the fourth century, who, having been captured by robbers in this glen, after his escape founded a