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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 139
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 139. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2346.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 139. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2346

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 139, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2346.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 139
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_157.jpg
Transcript THE GARDENS OE SOLOMON. . 139 mulberries, and peaches, with vines on the steeper slopes. This garden, which is now the important source of the supply of the Jerusalem market, owes its origin entirely to the efforts of friends of the Jews1 Society, seeking to provide agricultural employment for the Christian Jews on their own land. We now pass up the tiny glen to El Burak (Solomon's Pools), by the side of the direct road from Bethlehem to Hebron (see page 145). Immediately on leaving the enclosed gardens barrenness resumes its sway. The valley was once full of oaks of large size, and stumps may here and there be seen, now sought for and dug up for firewood. The pools are marked at a distance by the great square castle at the north-west corner of the upper one—a late Saracenic structure serving the purposes of khan and barracks for a few soldiers. The pools are three in number and in steps, each at a considerably lower level than the one above it, and are formed by walls of massive masonry stretching across the valley. They are chiefly hewn out of the native rock, the upper one especially being considerably heightened by masonry strengthened by buttresses. There is a space of over fifty yards between each pool. We can see at once the reason for constructing three basins, for a single reservoir to hold so large a supply would have demanded an embankment of enormous strength. The tanks are all widest at the lower end, one hundred and twenty-seven, one hundred and forty-one, and one hundred and ninety-six yards in length respectively, and varying in width from fifty-three to eighty yards, and twenty-five, thirty-eight, and forty-eight feet deep respectively. To enable the pools to be cleaned and water to be drawn on the spot when not quite full, there are flights of stairs inside the lower end of each. Not only are the supplies from several springs, near and distant, carefully conducted by subterranean channels into the pools, but there are also channels for the collection and conveyance of rain-water, so that nothing shall be lost. The " sealed spring," as it is called, from the belief that it is identical with the " sealed fountain" of Solomon's Song, is the most important source of supply. It rises in a field a little to the west, is trapped in a vaulted chamber, and conveyed by a subterranean channel into the upper pool. Besides this there are at least three other fountains which by a similar contrivance feed the reservoir. From the lower end of the lower pool the great aqueduct, by a winding course along the hillsides, conveys the water to Jerusalem, to Mount Moriah, immediately under the Temple. There are, however, according to Mr. Drake, in reality six aqueducts connected with Urtas and Solomon's Pools. The first, coming from the south, proceeds to El Burak, and is of a different and probably earlier style of masonry than the continuation to Jerusalem, which is the second, or low-level aqueduct; this is composed of earthen pipes set in masonry, with air-holes at intervals to relieve the pressure. The third is the high-level aqueduct which enters Jerusalem by the Birket Mamilla, near the Jaffa Gate. A fourth aqueduct in the same direction is entirely ruined, while the fifth and sixth supplied villages or towns to the eastward ; one of them can be traced nearly to Jebel Fureidis. It is stated that several portions of these aqueducts prove that their builders were aware of the fact of water finding its level when confined. It is generally now believed that these are all"of