Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 138
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 138. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2345.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 138. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2345

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 138, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2345.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 138
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_156.jpg
Transcript i g PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. brought from the Dead Sea. But by far the most popular wares to the pilgrims are the rosaries, of which piles may be seen heaped on the ground in front of the dealers. The cheapest are simply strings of olive-stones, with the round, hard seed of the " butm " inserted in each eleventh place. Others are turned beads of olive-wood, grown of course on the Mount of Olives ; and some are really richly carved and elaborately ornamented in the lathe. To each rosary an additional value of about a piastre is imparted if it has been blessed by the Patriarch. It is remarkable that no unblessed rosaries or crosses are to be found, and unless they are consecrated wholesale this part of the Patriarch's labours can be no sinecure. The great mart for all such wares is about the Church of the Nativity and in its porticoes, where the dealers sit on the pavement, and no one who values peace and quiet will attempt to evade the not unreasonable tax which is laid on the stranger. Besides, a liberal purchaser is likely to give the opportunity for an invitation to visit the workshop, and consequently to see the interior of an Oriental home. We have lingered long in and around hallowed Bethlehem. Thence our course lies towards the south-east if we would visit the spots of greatest historic and archaeological interest in the neighbourhood—the Pools of Solomon, Etham, and Herodium. As we descend southwards from Bethlehem the rich valley and fine olive-groves on the right give some idea of what the whole country was in the days when it was a land flowing with milk and honey. Here and there we see on the hillsides the broken aqueduct which once conveyed the supplies from Solomon's Pools to Bethlehem and Jerusalem. On our left we catch occasional glimpses of the wilderness of David's wanderings, and perched on a height are the mounds of Tekoa. We leave the Hebron road, and turning eastward we enter the little Valley of Urtas, near the head of which are the Pools of Solomon. A mound of ruins on the south side on the top of a hill is supposed to mark the site of the ancient Etham. The modern vijlage of Urtas is below. The place is best known and visited as "the Gardens of Solomon." Etham must not be confounded with the rock Etam where Samson took refuge, and which is far to the westward near the Philistine plain, probably the modern 'Atab. From the upper valley of Etham Josephus tells us the gardens of Solomon were watered, and recent researches have corroborated the tradition which marks this as their site. We know that "Solomon made him a garden and orchards, and planted in them all kinds of fruits, and pools of water to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees," and Josephus amplifies the account by telling us that he made him a chariot of wood of Lebanon lined with gold, and a canopy o{ purple silk on silver pillars, in which he used, clothed in white, to drive to his gardens every morning; for he had laid causeways of black stone (basalt) along all the roads that led to Jerusalem, upon which he could drive his chariot with ease and swiftness. These smooth causeways have, alas!" long since disappeared. When first we visited the valley, twenty-five years since, it was bleak and bare like the surrounding country; now on entering it we find ourselves suddenly in a bright contrast of cultivation and luxuriant verdure, with vegetables of every kind shaded by orchards that soon may recall Solomon's apricots,