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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 136
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 136. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 136. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2343

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 136, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 136
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_154.jpg
Transcript 136 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. condescend to it. In the houses of the richer class several servant-maids or slave-girls are kept continually at the tedious task. " From Pharaoh to the maidservant that is behind the mill," shows the estimation in which grinding was held. As we pass through the streets at the evening hour we hear the low monotonous hum of the hand-mill—the "quern" of the Scottish Highlands. There is a hole in the centre of the upper millstone through which the grain is passed, a handful at a time, by one of the two women who sit facing each other. " Two women shall be grinding at the mill." Nearer the edge is another hole, in which an upright handle is fixed ; both the women hold this together, and work it as two men would a crosscut saw. The flour falls out on to a cloth on which the nether millstone is placed. The stones are usually made of lava brought from the Hauran, harder and lighter than the sandstone of the country, which indeed is not very common, the whole formation of Central and Southern Palestine being soft, chalky, Eocene limestone. But we cannot leave Bethlehem without recalling some of those picturesque ceremonies connected with the Church of the Nativity, which arouse in the thousands of pilgrims far more enthusiasm than any of the Scripture scenes and illustrations. Naturally the most remarkable and the most frequented are those of Christmastide. The ceremonial is very gorgeous, but few would care to undergo a second time the fatigue, crowding, and heat of a service held in these suffocating caves, which lasts for nine hours. The French Consul from Jerusalem is, next to the Patriarch, the most important personage on the occasion, representing " the eldest son of the Church." He sets out on the forenoon of Christmas eve from the city, in full state and with an imposing retinue. He is met by the Christians outside Bethlehem and conducted in procession to the Latin Chapel. The service continues without intermission until midnight, when there is a sudden pause, all the candles on the altar are lighted, and a little wax image appears above it, and the " Gloria in excelsis" bursts forth with the utmost power of organ, choir, and shepherds' pipes combined. Mass and other services follow without intermission for two hours, when the Patriarch carries the wax figure in a cradle from the chapel across the church and down to the Grotto of the Nativity, where he lays it on the slab that marks the supposed spot of the birth, and wraps it in strips of swaddling clothes, while the Gospel history of the wondrous event is being read. The procession, with the Patriarch and Consul, after a while return to the Latin Chapel, when high mass is again performed, and the services continue until after sunrise. The Christmas festivals—for the Greek and Latin celebrations are on different days, o.s. and n.s. respectively—are to Bethlehem what the Easter ceremonies are to Jerusalem—the main support of the industry and manufactures of the place, which depend upon the production and sale of pilgrim wares. At Christmas the harvest is reaped for which ever since last Easter the Bethlehemite at home has been industriously preparing. Every one who has been down to the Jordan and there bathed is considered to have completed his pilgrimage, and is henceforth a palmer, entitled to wear the scallop-shell in his hat. The name " palmer " is derived from the palm-branch (djereed) which in former days each pilgrim cut in the Valley