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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 132
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 132. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2339.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 132. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2339

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 132, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2339.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 132
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_150.jpg
Transcript mmmm I32 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. of the people in harvest may be more freely studied than in Christian and peaceful Bethlehem. They are a practical commentary on the Book of Ruth. The corn-plain is, and always was, held in individual proprietorship, while the outlying and unfenced district beyond {fores), the "forest" of our ancestors in England, though strictly held by the townsmen as against all others, yet is pastured by all in common, according to regulations agreed on, exactly like the old common rights of many an English village before the days of Enclosure Acts. Fences there are none, but every here and there we see the stone set up, the landmark, a straight line from which to the next stone marks the boundary of each property. The stone is generally a rude undressed block partially sunk in the ground. We have seen an ancient Roman milestone thus used. When we note how very easy it would be for the dishonest to move the stone a few feet without detection, we can well understand the curse pronounced on the man who should remove his neighbour's landmarks. The harvest-field is a merry scene. The whole village turns out, and the children and aged are as busily employed in gleaning as the able-bodied of both sexes in reaping; But as the harvest is earlier on the plains than in the hills, commencing in April, and in the Jordan Valley sometimes in March, many labourers come down to work for hire, sleeping on the field by night, and bringing their families with them, who share with the residents the privilege of gleaning. Reaping is not made a toilsome labour, for weather is certain, and we have seen a whole row of reapers using their sickles as they sat, and working their bodies along after the corn without attempting to rise. This, however, is rather Moslem than Christian fashion. The farmer or proprietor still, as he walks up to the reapers, salutes them in the very words of Boaz, "The Lord be with you" {Allah aleikum), and the response is still the same, " The Lord bless thee." The threshing- floor is generally on the spot, so that it is not necessary to carry the crop in bulk far for threshing, and by the baider the owner and his family sleep, as did Boaz, generally under a tent, while the labourers from a distance lie on the ground around. The poor gleaners sit down by the roadside, as Ruth did, and beat out with a stick on their heavy veils the ears they have gleaned, to save the labour of carrying home the straw. Meantime the reapers prepare their simple evening meal. A small heap of stubble or straw is kindled, the ears cut off are tossed on the fire, and as soon as the straw is consumed, they are dexterously swept from the embers on to a cloak spread on the ground. They are then beaten out and winnowed by being tossed into the air, and eaten without further preparation. The green ears become half charred by the roasting, and there is a pleasant mingling of milky wheat and a fresh crust flavour as we chew the parched corn. Sometimes the corn is held in bunches over the fire till the chaff is burned off, instead of being tossed into the blaze. Of course the privilege of supplying themselves from the field by the labourers is never disputed. The boisterous mirth and rude practical joking which fill up the evening after the supper remind us that Boaz's caution to his young men to behave respectfully to the damsel was likely to be no less needful then than now. The barley harvest is finished sometimes before the wheat harvest begins; thus Ruth gleaned "unto the end of barley harvest and of wheat harvest."