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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 130
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 130. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 130. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2337

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 130, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 130
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_148.jpg
Transcript 13° PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. student. Here for thirty-four years the aged and venerable father studied and wrote. Driven from Rome by the bitterness of theological partisanship, his fiery spirit found rest and employment in seclusion on the site of the cradle of the Christian faith. Here in his cavern-home he fasted and prayed. But here, above all, he carried out and completed what he had years before begun, the revision of the various versions of the Scriptures, and from this dark cave proceeded that precious heritage of the Christian Church for all time, the Latin version so well known as the Vulgate. Besides his great work he was ceaseless as a pamphleteer. Epistles, tractates, commentaries issued with marvellous rapidity from the Grotto of Bethlehem, till we possess one hundred and fifty epistles, sixteen treatises, thirteen volumes of commentaries, besides his Latin version and his translation and continuation of the History of Eusebius. Verily there were giants in those clays. Nor can we forget that closing scene of all, which Domenichino has commemorated for all time in his immortal picture, when the aged saint, with his mortal frame worn and exhausted by years and labours, but rejoicing and triumphant in spirit, on the threshold of the next world receives the communion and yields up the ghost. We shall see as we travel through Judaea how potent was the influence and example of St. Jerome in the caves and rock-hewn cells which fill the cliff sides of the Jordan Valley and stud the rest of the country, the homes of the anchorites and the small religious communities which sprang from Bethlehem, the faithful copyists of the austerities but not of the activities of the mighty Latin father. Not content, however, with the historical, the traditional has been largely drawn upon for sacred localities. We leave the convent, and among the many little hillside caves, partly natural and partly artificial, is one which in popular estimation is second only to the Grotto of the Nativity. This is the Milk Grotto, of which an engraving is given (see page 135). It has no special feature beyond the unusual whiteness of the soft chalk out of which it is excavated. The story told is that here Joseph and the Virgin Mother concealed themselves and the Divine Infant before their flight into Egypt from the fury of Herod, and that some drops of the Virgin's milk gave the rock its peculiar whiteness. The place is consequently the resort of numbers of pilgrims, drawn especially by the belief that the application of a fragment of the rock will produce an abundant supply for any infant at the mother's breast. As the rock is very soft, there is no difficulty in breaking off fragments, which are carried as precious charms into all the Christian countries of the South and East. As we descend into the valley, the corn-fields of Bethlehem, we are reminded by the peep we have just had of the Mountains of Moab how near we are actually to the home of Ruth. In the afternoon especially the western sun lights up the long distant line with a delicate pink, which gives an impression of nearness wanting in the morning, when they loom grey in front of the rising sun, or at noon, when there is generally a heat haze between us and them, caused by the evaporation from the Dead Sea. Most travellers visit Bethlehem in the early spring, long before the corn is ripe; but there are few parts of the country where the customs