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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 122
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 122. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 122. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2329

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 122, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 122
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_140.jpg
Transcript 122 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and paved, the chariot of Solomon must often have passed as he went to visit his favourite gardens at Etham. Here, too, after the lapse of a thousand years, the mother of David's greater Son wearily trod the last stage of her journey to be enrolled in her ancestral town, and there to give birth to the world's Saviour. We leave Jerusalem by the western or Jaffa Gate. On the right, just above us, is the Birket Mamilla, or Upper Pool of Gihon, which still supplies the Pool of Hezekiah inside the walls with the drainage from the Moslem cemetery. Just below, on the left, at the head of the Valley of Hinnom, we pass the Birket es Sultan, or Lower Pool of Gihon. On their disputed identity we need not enter, though the lower pool, at least in its present form, appears to have been repaired, if not constructed, by the crusading besiegers of Jerusalem. In curious contrast with the antique surroundings, on the slope of the hill, opposite the lower pool, stand a modern windmill and rows of smart cottages, the gift of Sir Moses Montefiore— the Peabody of Jerusalem—for the benefit of his oppressed Hebrew brethren. And now we cross the valley, or rather plain, of Rephaim, the scene of two of David's encounters with the Philistine army, and for the identification of which we have at least the authority of Josephus. The road is rough and stony, for wheel carriages there are none. Nor less stony is the plain in winter, though in springtime all is clothed with a rich carpet of flowers, short and dense. Here and there we may trace on the slopes above us the broken aqueduct which by Solomon's care once conveyed the water supply of Jerusalem from the pools and springs of El Burak. The first architectural feature on our road is the Convent of Mar Elyas, grey, grim, and unattractive, with a cold-looking wall almost concealing the inner buildings. The Greek monks will solemnly assure you that on this very spot Elijah lay down to rest when he fled from Jezebel, not under a juniper, but an olive, and that here angels miraculously supplied his needs. In proof of the truth of the tradition they will show, close to their gate, a shallow depression in the smooth rock, the mark of the prophet's body when he reposed here. The view, however, will repay the traveller who hesitates to accept the tradition. We catch a glimpse of Bethlehem climbing the shoulder of the ridge, and we can see a corner of Jerusalem, though the hill of Evil Counsel, with the tree on which a very modern tradition says Judas hanged himself, shuts out the minarets of Moriah. But the wild landscape eastward, with rugged hill and deep glen, wanting but forest to make it impressive, tells us how closely we are skirting the wilderness of Judaea, while a long ruddy line, the crest of the ridge, or rather the wall, of Moab, forms the distant horizon. A sharp descent, and we halt by a modern " wely " or roadside chapel— a small square whitewashed piece of masonry surmounted by a central dome. It is Rachel's Tomb (see page 126). Here at least we have not our dreams and musings disturbed by the intrusion of the topographical sceptic. For once we have an undisputed site. Israelite, Christian, and Moslem have but one tradition respecting it, and all agree in recognising the spot where, when Jacob "journeyed from Bethel, and there was but a little way to come to Ephrath, Rachel died and was buried on the way to Ephrath, which is Bethlehem. And Jacob set a pillar upon h er