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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 119
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 119. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 119. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2326

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 119, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 119
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_137.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 119 sometimes run into wild excess. The Karaim or Karaites, who do not acknowledge the authority of the Talmud, form a small community apart from the other sects. Much has been done during the last twenty years to ameliorate the condition of the Jews at Jerusalem by Sir Moses Montefiore, Baron Rothschild, and other wealthy European Jews, and every year sums of money are sent for distribution amongst the poor. The Christians are divided into a number of sects, of which the Orthodox Greek Church is the most influential. The Greek community consists of monks, nuns, shopkeepers, &c, very few of whom are natives of the country. The Patriarch of Jerusalem, who has several sees in Palestine subject to him, resides in the great monastery of St. Helena and Constantine. The Armenians are few in number, but they form a thriving community, and occupy one of the pleasantest quarters of Jerusalem (see page 102). The Armenian Monastery, with its church dedicated to St. James, is the largest and richest in the city. The spiritual head of the Armenians is the Patriarch of Jerusalem, a well-educated man, who resides in the monastery. The Georgians are now an insignificant body, but they had at one time eleven churches and monasteries in the Holy City, and even as late as the commencement of the sixteenth century had many rights and privileges not accorded to other Christians. All that now remains to them is the Convent of the Cross, about half an hour's ride from Jerusalem. The Syrians or Jacobites, so called from Jacobus Baradaeus, a heretical monk who lived in the sixth century, are few in number, and have as their sole possession in Jerusalem the little monastery known as the House of St. Mark. The Copts have a large monastery close to the eastern end of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which was repaired a few years ago with funds provided by wealthy Copts in Egypt; they have also a monastery near the Pool of Hezekiah. The Abyssinians occupy a few cells in the ruins of a monastery above the Chapel of Helena. They are extremely poor, and are said to have had much of their revenue and some of their buildings taken from them by their powerful neighbours the Copts. The Latins or Roman Catholics are the most numerous of the Western Christians. They possess the well-known Monastery of St. Salvator, the Church of the Scourging in the Via Dolorosa, the Convent of the Sisters of Sion, the Garden of Gethsemane, and other places. There is an excellent printing-press attached to the monastery, schools for both sexes, an industrial school, and a hospital. The monastery and other establishments are in the hands of the Franciscan monks, most of whom are Spaniards or Italians. Some of the monks are men of education and culture, and the printing-press has produced useful works in different languages. In 1847 the Latin patriarchate, which had been in abeyance since the latter part of the thirteenth century, was revived, and Monsignor Valerga, who died in 1873, was appointed Patriarch. The Greek Catholic and Armenian Catholic Churches are affiliated to the Latin. The Protestant community, though small, is active in good works, and there are several excellent Protestant establishments in the city and its vicinity. The schools especially have had a marked effect, not only in supplying a good education themselves, but in inciting other