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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 116
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 116. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2323.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 116. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2323

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 116, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2323.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 116
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_134.jpg
Transcript , T 6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. springs in the side valleys which contributed to the supply, but the principal source was the flood water. This mode of collecting water is very common in Persia and Afghanistan, where the underground conduit is called a kariz ; but it is doubtful whether another instance could be found of a tunnel nearly five miles long cut in hard limestone. About six hundred yards below the dam the conduit enters another tunnel, seventeen hundred feet long, which at one point is one hundred and fifteen feet below the surface of the ground. Eleven shafts were sunk to aid the work of excavation, and the passage is in places fourteen feet high. After passing through the tunnel the conduit winds round the hill to the valley in which the Pools of Solomon lie. It then crosses that valley above the upper pool in an underground channel which tapped the Sealed Fountain, and formerly brought it, with its own waters, to the high level in Jerusalem. After leaving the pools the aqueduct at first runs along the side of the Valley of Urtas, but at a point not far from Bethlehem it enters a tank, and thence, when perfect, carried the water over the valley near Rachel's Tomb by means of an inverted syphon. This syphon was about two miles long, and consisted of perforated blocks of stone set in a mass of rubble masonry some three feet thick all round. The tube is fifteen inches in diameter, and the joints, which appear to have been ground or turned, are put together with an extremely hard cement. The whole work is a remarkable specimen of ancient engineering skill, and the labour bestowed on the details excites the admiration of all travellers. This portion is known amongst the native peasantry as the " Aqueduct of the Unbelievers." On approaching Jerusalem all trace of the conduit is lost. It has evidently been destroyed during one of the many sieges, and the point at which it entered the city is still uncertain. The most interesting feature, however, is that the supply was brought to Jerusalem at an elevation of twenty feet over the sill of the Jaffa Gate, and that the conduit would have been able to deliver water to the highest part of the city, and so provide an adequate supply for the whole population. Some persons have supposed that the high-level aqueduct supplied the Birket Mamilla and thence the Citadel; but it seems not improbable that the conduit wound round the head of the Valley of Hinnom and entered the city at the north-west angle, where the Tower Psephinus stood. This view is supported by the discovery some years ago of a conduit within the Russian consular enclosure, which was afterwards found in some ground belonging to M. Bergheim without the city, and beneath the house of the Latin Patriarch within the walls. The direction of this conduit was towards the tower which most nearly agrees with the Hippicus of Josephus, that at the Jaffa Gate; and thence the water was in all probability carried onward to the Temple enclosure by the conduit which was discovered far below the level of the present surface when the English church and vicarage were built. The date of the high-level aqueduct has been the subject of some discussion, without any very satisfactory result. There is, however, a passage in Josephus which seems to throw some light on the question. In describing Herod's Palace, which occupied the site of the present Citadel, the historian states that " there were, moreover, several oroves of trees and long walks through them, with deep canals and cisterns, that in several parts were filled with brazen