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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 113
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 113. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2320.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 113. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2320

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 113, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2320.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 113
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_131.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 113 text in having Gihon. Josephus, however, states that David ordered Zadok and Benaiah to carry Solomon " out of the city to the fountain called Gihon and to anoint him there." 1 he spring stopped by Hezekiah appears to have been some distance up the Tyropoeon Valley. Its position has not yet been discovered, but the rock-hewn conduit which has been found running along the bed of the Tyropoeon Valley is believed to be the work of Hezekiah, and the water which sometimes finds its way through it may come from the spring. No well has yet been discovered at Jerusalem except Bir Eyub (Job's Well), but others may possibly exist beneath the rubbish. Close to Bir Eyub there is a remarkable work which must have involved a great expenditure of time and labour. It consists of a drift or tunnel some six feet high and from two to three feet wide, cut in the solid rock. The tunnel is more than eighteen hundred feet long, and runs beneath the western side of the bed of the valley at a depth of from seventy to ninety feet from the surface. It is reached at certain intervals by flights of rock-hewn steps. The object of this tunnel seems to have been the collection of the water running in between the beds of limestone, and it is interesting to find that a work of such magnitude was considered necessary at a level so much lower than that of the city. It clearly shows that there must always have been some difficulty in providing Jerusalem with water. The most important system of supply was, however, that by which water was brought into the city from the south by aqueducts. The supply was derived from three sources, and the conduits were apparently constructed at different periods. They were of considerable extent, and the remains exhibit a degree of engineering skill which could not well be surpassed at the present day. The first works, and perhaps the most ancient, are those connected with the Pools of Solomon. These pools, three in number, are cleverly and well constructed in the bed of a valley not far from Bethlehem, and they are so situated that the water from each of the upper pools can be run off into the one immediately below it as the supply is drawn upon. The water was first carried to Bethlehem, and, passing under that town through a tunnel, was finally delivered in the Temple area at Jerusalem. From the pools to Bethlehem the fall of the conduit is about one in eight hundred, but from Bethlehem to Jerusalem it is only one in five thousand two hundred. The total length is seventy thousand feet, and the total fall thirty-two feet, which gives a mean fall of less than two and a half feet per mile. This conduit, to which the name " low-level aqueduct" has been given, crosses the Valley of Hinnom a little above the Birket es Sultan (see page 106) on several pointed arches, which just show their heads above ground, and, winding round the southern slope of the modern Sion, enters the city near the Jewish almshouses. It then passes along the eastern side of the same hill, partly supported by masonry and partly through a tunnel, until, taking a sudden turn eastward, it runs over the causeway and Wilson's Arch, and enters the Haram esh Sherif at the Gate of the Chain. The numerous Saracenic fountains in the lower part of the city were supplied by pipes branching off from the main aqueduct. The channels and conduits in 16