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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 112
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 112. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 112. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2319

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 112, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 112
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_130.jpg
Transcript i! 2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. whilst the other had reddish water, "as they say, from the sacrifices;" but they give no indication of its position. The Bourdeaux pilgrim says that the double pools were more within the city than the two large pools at the side of the Temple, and that the water was muddy and of a scarlet colour. This discoloration of the water no doubt arose from the quantity of rich red loamy earth which was carried into the pool after heavy rain. The actual position of the biblical Bethesda is uncertain; Dr. Robinson has suggested that it is identical with the Fountain of the Virgin, but the more general view is that the pool was to the north of the Temple, either in the position modern tradition assigns to it or farther to the west, where the souterrains connected with the Convent of the Sisters of Zion mark the position of a double pool in the old ditch. Near the Cotton Gate of the Haram there is said to have been a reservoir some years ago, and there was another close to the Jaffa Gate, which was called the Pool or Bath of Bathsheba on the supposition that David dwelt in the Tower of David opposite. One of the aqueducts from Solomon's Pools is repaired occasionally and then delivers water to the cisterns of the Haram esh Sherif, and supplies some of the beautiful fountains in the city; but the repairs rarely last for any length of time, and the aqueducts may be considered as forming part of the ancient rather than of the modern system of water supply. The ancient supply was partly derived from the same sources as the modern one, but the inhabitants appear to have depended chiefly on water brought from a distance by aqueducts and stored in pools and cisterns. Of the springs, wells, pools, &c, mentioned in the Bible and Josephus, Enrogel may almost certainly be identified with the Fountain of the Virgin, and the same spring is probably Gihon in the valley (2 Chron. xxxiii. 14), as nachal, the word rendered valley, is always employed for the Valley of the Kedron ; the water running from the Fountain may also be identified with the waters of Shiloah (Isaiah viii. 6). So, too, the Fountain of Siloam of Josephus and the Pool of Siloam of the New Testament may be placed at the modern Pool of Siloam, which is fed from the Virgin's Fountain. There is, however, a passage in the Mishna which describes Siloam as being in the midst of the city, and Dr. Lightfoot asserts that there is a difference in the Hebrew between the Siloah of Nehemiah and the Shiloah of Isaiah ; a distinction which seems, on one occasion at least, to be made by Josephus. The Septuagint, too, whilst rendering the latter Siloam, translates the former as " the Pool of the Sheep-skins." From this it may almost be inferred that there was another pool called Siloah higher up the Tyropoeon Valley, a position which would be more in accordance with the conditions required by the description of the rebuilding and dedication of the walls under Nehemiah. Gihon is mentioned in two other passages in the Bible : in 1 Kings i. 33, Solomon is said to have been anointed at Gihon; and in 2 Chron. xxxii. 30, Hezekiah is described as having stopped the upper source of Gihon, and as having brought the waters straight down to the west side of the city of David. The Targum of Jonathan, and the Syriac and Arabic versions, have Shiloha for Gihon in Kings, whilst in Chronicles they agree with the Hebrew