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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 109
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 109. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 109. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2316

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 109, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 109
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_127.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 109 above the pool the aqueduct from Solomon's Pools crosses the valley (see page 106), and a road, which may have existed at an early date, passes over the causeway. The Birket es Sultan was repaired by Sultan Suleiman, hence its name, but it appears to have existed at an early date, and was sometimes identified with the Lower Pool of Gihon ; during the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem it was called Germanus. The Birket Sitti Miriam is a small pool near St. Stephen's Gate, which still holds water; it receives little or no surface drainage, and must always have been supplied by the conduit of which the mouth is still to be seen in the north-east corner of the reservoir. The two Pools of Siloam (see pages yy and 79) are situated in the Tyropoeon Valley not far from its mouth. The upper and smaller pool receives its supply of water from the Fountain of the Virgin by means of the remarkable rock-hewn conduit which has already been noticed ; the water runs off at the south-east corner, and after having been used by the washerwomen of the city passes on to irrigate the gardens below. From the centre of the pool rises the broken shaft of a column; at the south-west corner a rude flight of steps leads to the bottom ; at one place there are some piers rapidly going to ruin ; and all round the pool there is a large accumulation of rubbish. The remains which are seen now probably date from the twelfth century; but in the early part of the seventh century there was a round basilica, from under which the water rose, with two marble reservoirs, and enclosures with wooden railings. The largest pool in the neighbourhood of the city was probably that which lies to the left of the main road which leads northward from Jerusalem, a little beyond the Tombs of the Kings. It is now nearly filled with soil washed down by the winter rains, but at the upper end there is still a shallow excavation which holds water, and at the lower end the scarped rock is visible. The pool is admirably situated for collecting the surface drainage of the upper branches of the Kedron Valley, but all attempts to discover the conduit by which it transmitted its water to the city have hitherto been unsuccessful. The Pool of Hezekiah (see page 13), within the city, is situated close to Christian Street; it receives its principal supply of water from the Birket Mamilla without the walls, and it is calculated to hold about four million gallons. The masonry does not appear to be very old, and but a small portion of the pool has been formed by actual excavation. The cement is bad and out of repair, and the bottom is covered with a thick deposit of vegetable mould, the accumulation of several years. When the pool is full in winter no inconvenience arises, but in autumn, when the water gets low, exhalations rise up which have a bad effect on the health of those who live in the neighbourhood. The water is chiefly used in the Turkish " Bath of the Patriarch," whence the pool derives its local name, " Pool of the Patriarch's Bath ;" the Christian name, " Pool of Hezekiah," comes from the tradition that it was made by that king, as in 2 Kings xx. 20 : " Hezekiah made a pool and a conduit and brought water into the city." There is, perhaps, better reason for identifying the pool with that called by Josephus Amygdalon, where the celebrated tenth legion raised a bank against the city walls during the siege by Titus. The Pool of Bethesda, or Birket Israil, does not now hold water; it is