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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 108
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 108. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2315.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 108. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2315

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 108, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2315.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 108
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_126.jpg
Transcript Io8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. class are entirely dependent on the rain which falls during the winter; those which have been constructed by Europeans in convents and dwelling-houses are good, and, being carefully cleaned out every year, furnish water that is always clean and sweet. Such, however, is not the case with those in the native houses; when the rain commences, as much as possible is collected, even from the streets, which, being the common latrine of the city, are by the end of the rainy season in a very filthy state. Every duct is opened, and all the summer's accumulation of rubbish and refuse is carried from roof and courtyard to the cistern below. During the early part of summer little evil arises, but towards autumn the water gets low, the buckets in descending stir up the deposit, and the mixture which thousands then have to use as their daily beverage is almost too horrible to think of. At this time, too, a sort of miasma seems to rise up from the refuse and the fever season commences. The most remarkable cisterns are those in the Haram esh Sherif, and the cistern of Helena near the Church of the Holy Sepulchre ; there are, however, a vast number both within and without the city, and some of them are of great size. The pools or reservoirs of which remains exist at present are—the Birket Mamilla, the Birket es Sultan, the Birket Sitti Mariam, the two Pools of Siloam, and a pool near the Tombs of the Kings, without the walls; and the so-called Pools of Hezekiah and Bethesda within the city. There is also undoubted tradition of pools near the Jaffa Gate, the Gate of the Chain, and the Church of St. Anne ; these are now concealed by rubbish. The Birket Mamilla collects the surface drainage of the upper part of the Valley of Hinnom, and transmits its water to the Pool of Hezekiah by a conduit which passes under the city wall a little to the north of the Jaffa Gate, and has a branch running down to the cisterns in the Citadel (see page 102). The average depth of the pool is nineteen feet; it is three hundred and fifteen feet long, and two hundred and eight feet wide; the estimated capacity is eight million gallons, but there is a large accumulation of rubbish at the bottom, and it now holds water imperfectly. The pool has not been well placed for collecting the drainage, as that from the western slope is lost, but the position was necessary to obtain a level high enough to supply the Pool of Hezekiah and the Citadel. A hole in the ground below the lower end of the pool gives access to a flight of steps leading down to a small chamber, where the conduit, which on leaving the pool is twenty-one inches square, narrows to nine inches, so as to allow of an arrangement for regulating the flow of water into the city. The Birket Mamilla has sometimes been identified with the Upper Pool of Gihon, but it is more probably the Serpent Pool mentioned by Josephus, a name which may have had its origin in the Dragon's Well of Nehemiah, which seems to have been situated to the west of Jerusalem. The Birket es Sultan (see page 102) lies in the Valley of Hinnom, but at so low a level that its only use could have been the irrigation of gardens lower down the valley. The pool does not now hold water; it is, however, of considerable extent, and would contain about nineteen million gallons. The reservoir has been formed by building a solid dam or causeway across the valley, and closing the upper end by a slight embankment; at the sides the rock is left for the most part in its natural state. Immediately