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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 104
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 104. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 104. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2311

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 104, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 104
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_122.jpg
Transcript I04 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. hundred feet long, about two feet wide, and from one foot ten inches to sixteen feet in height. The lower portion is not easy to pass through, especially if the spring commences to flow whilst the explorer is engaged in making the attempt. In connection with the passage Captain Warren opened out a rock-hewn canal, which ran for some distance due west, with a slight fall, so that the water from the spring could flow down to the western end, where a shallow basin had been excavated to receive it. From this point a circular shaft, more than forty feet high, led upwards to a great corridor excavated in the rock, whence a flight of steps gave access to the surface at a point, on that portion of Mount Moriah known as Ophel, which must have been well within the ancient walls of the city. It was thus possible for the Jews on the approach of an enemy to close or " seal " the well with blocks of stone, and at the same time procure a supply of water for their own use by means of the shaft or well within the walls. In the corridor three glass lamps of curious construction were found placed at intervals, as if to light up the passage to the shaft. A little pile of charcoal, as if for cooking, a dish glazed inside, jars of red pottery, and other lamps, were also found, as well as an iron ring overhanging the shaft, to which a rope might have been attached for drawing water. The Virgin's Fountain derives its name from the tradition that the Virgin drew water from the well and washed the swaddling clothes there. The only real well at Jerusalem is Bir Eyub, Job's Well (see page 120), situated a little below the junction of the Kedron and Hinnom Valleys. It has a depth of one hundred and twenty-five feet, and the water, which is collected in a large rock-hewn chamber at the bottom, is derived from the drainage of the two valleys and their offshoots. The supply is directly dependent on the rainfall, and in winter the water occasionally rises above the shaft and flows down the valley in a stream. This generally occurs in January, after from three to five consecutive days' rain. At a depth of one hundred and thirteen feet there is a large chamber, from the bottom of which a shaft leads downwards to the present collector. This seems to indicate that the well was deepened at some period. There is much rubbish in this part of the valley, and the plan in constructing the well seems to have been to try and stop out the surface drainage, which might be charged with impurities from the city, and to depend entirely on the water which runs in freely between the lower beds of the limestone. The well, which is one of the principal sources of supply to the poorer classes, is inconveniently situated at the foot of a steep hill, and the water has to be carried to Jerusalem in goat skins. This traffic is almost entirely in the hands of the villagers of Silwan (Siloam), who charge from one penny to sixpence per skin for water delivered in the city, and are much given to cheating by partly filling the skins with air. The water of Bir Eyub has, though in a much less degree, the peculiar taste of that of Siloam. This probably arises from the fact that the surface drainage from the city is imperfectly stopped out. In the Tyropoeon Valley there is a well that supplies water to the Turkish bath in the old Cotton Market. The shaft of the well, eighty feet deep, passes entirely through rubbish, and at its foot there is a rock-hewn conduit stretching in a southerly direction, in which the