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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 101
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 101. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2308.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 101. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2308

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 101, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2308.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 101
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_119.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 101 excavated in this stratum. Captain Warren's excavations have shown us the deep rugged character of the Tyropoeon Valley in its normal state, and, judging from what is seen in the surrounding valleys, the malaki bed would appear on each side of the valley as a cliff; in the face of this cliff were, in all probability, the entrances to the tombs of David and the other kings who were buried in the City of David. David's Tomb appears to have been the lowest, or that nearest Siloam ; the others were higher up the valley, and some at least, we may infer from Ezekiel xliii. 7, 8, were close to the Temple. There can be no reasonable doubt that excavations properly directed would recover these tombs. The works connected with the water supply of Jerusalem are of very great interest. It is well known that in the many sieges which the Holy City has sustained the besiegers without the walls suffered from want of water, whilst the besieged within were amply supplied. The cisterns hewn out of the rock for the storage of water in the Haram esh Sherif have already been alluded to, but they only formed part of the general scheme for the supply of water to the whole city. The present supply is deficient in quantity and as a rule bad in quality ; to this may be attributed the fact that the city which the Psalmist once described in loving terms as " the joy of the whole earth," has become one of the most unhealthy cities of the world. The plateau on the edge of which the city is situated slopes uniformly to the south-east, and contains about one thousand acres ; it is composed of white, yellow, and buff limestones of the age of the English chalk. The upper beds, from eighteen inches to four feet in thickness, provide an extremely hard compact stone, called by the Arabs "missae;" whilst the lower, some forty feet in thickness, consist of a soft white stone termed " malaki." In this latter bed most of the ancient tombs and cisterns at Jerusalem have been excavated. The strata are much broken and cracked, so that the rain readily sinks into the ground, and finds its way downwards through a thousand hidden channels, to be given out at a lower level. The general direction of this underground flow and of the surface drainage of the plateau is towards Bir Eyub ("Job's Well"), below the junction of the two main ravines, Kedron and Hinnom (see page 117). It was at one time supposed that the quantity of rain which fell at Jerusalem each year was very large, from fifty to eighty inches, but the average annual rainfall is really not more than about nineteen inches, and the rainy season is spread over the winter months from November to March. During the remaining months even a slight shower is of the rarest occurrence, and the heavens become, to use the graphic language of the Bible, as " brass," and the earth as " iron." Every three or four years there is a fall of snow, which lies on the ground for a day or two ; and, on the other hand, there is occasionally an almost total failure of rain. The number of cisterns and reservoirs which were excavated or built for the collection of the rainfall, and the skill exhibited in the construction of the conduits that brought water into the city, show pretty clearly that there has been no material change in the climate since the days of the Jewish monarchy.