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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 100
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 100. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 100. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2307

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 100, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 100
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_118.jpg
Transcript ioo PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. with trough graves, gives access to a large chamber containing shelf graves. The roofs f the chambers are cut into the shape of a flat, shallow dome. Great numbers of sarcophagi have been found in the vicinity of Jerusalem, some of wl ' h bear inscriptions of high interest and Christian symbols. On a few the sicm of the m* t> l Liit, cross is found associated with names written in Hebrew. The names are such as are found in th Gospels, written in their popular and local Syro-Chaldaic forms. Amongst them are Salom Judah, Simeon son,of Jesus, Martha, and Eleazar (Lazarus). There are a few tombs mentioned in the Bible and Josephus which cannot be passed unnoticed ; and first in interest and sacred association is that in which for a brief while our Lord lay. It was a new tomb, " wherein never man before was laid," which had I prepared for himself, and possibly his family also, by Joseph of Arimathea, a rich man and "an honourable councillor," or member of the Sanhedrim. It was hewn out of the rock and its mouth was closed by a "very great" stone that could be "rolled away," and upon which the angel could sit. It was, moreover, a tomb in which the place where the body lay could be seen from the outside by a person stooping down and looking in through the entrance. " And the other disciple did outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulchre; and he stoopino- down and looking in, saw the linen clothes lying, yet went he not in." Taking these things into consideration, we may almost be justified in assuming that Joseph's tomb was one of the second class, that is, a square, finely finished, rock-hewn chamber with kokim, a rock bench beneath the kokim for the anointment of the body, and a doorway closed by a circular stone similar to one which has been found at the Tombs of the Kings. The next tombs of interest are those of David and of the Kings of Judah, which were probably large sepulchral chambers hewn in the rock. There would appear to have been several tombs, the chiefest of which was David's tomb or, as the catacomb seems to have been called, "the sepulchres of the kings." Many of the kings were buried "with their fathers," that is in David's Tomb, in the City of David ; whilst of others, Joash and Jehoram for instance, we are told that they are buried in the City of David " but not in the sepulchres of the kings." Burial in the sepulchres of the kings was apparently considered a mark of honour. Josephus states that the high priest Jehoiada was buried in them " because he had recovered the kingdom to the family of David ; " and that Joash was not buried in them on account of his impiety. According to the Jewish historian, David's Tomb, or at least one of the tomb chambers, was opened by Hyrcanus, who took from it three thousand talents ; a second chamber was afterwards opened by Herod, who took out " furniture of gold ana precious jewels," but two of the guards having been slain by fire, the tomb was closed anc a propitiatory monument built at its mouth. St. Peter, speaking of David's death, says, " and itt sepulchre is with us unto this day." There is thus no doubt that the position of Davids Tomb was well known up to the date of the destruction of Jerusalem. All the principal tombs at Jerusalem are cut in the thick bed of limestone called " malaki, which is extremely easy to quarry, and the natural inference is that David's Tomb was