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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 95
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 95. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 95. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 95, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 95
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_112.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 95 cemetery is on the western slope of the same hill, above the Valley of Hinnom; it is the only burial-place near Jerusalem which is efficiently closed and properly tended. Within its walls lie the remains of the two first Anglican bishops of Jerusalem—Dr. Alexander and Dr. Gobat—and also those of Mr. Tyrwhitt Drake, who died of fever, due to exposure and over-exertion whilst engaged on the great work of the survey of Palestine. The Moslem cemeteries are—first, that extending along the eastern wall of the city, from a little north of St. Stephen's Gate to the vicinity of the south-east angle of the Haram esh Sherif, which, from its proximity to the sacred area, is most esteemed ; second, the ground above Jeremiah's Grotto ; and, third, the extensive cemetery round the Birket Mamilla, near the head of the Valley of Hinnom (see page 102). The great Jewish cemetery is on the western slope of the Mount of Olives ; it extends northwards from Siloam, and runs up the hill almost to the Tombs of the Prophets. In places, especially near Absalom's Pillar and the Tomb of Zacharias, the ground is literally paved with tombstones (see pages 82 and 85). The simplest form of tomb is that in which a common grave is sunk in the rock, and a reveal cut round its mouth to receive a covering slab. In some cases the slab is flush with the surface of the rock ; in others it is raised above it and ornamented like the lid of a sarcophagus. Another simple form of tomb, to which the name of " trough grave " has been given, is that in which an arched recess is cut in the face of the rock and a common grave sunk in its floor. A third simple form is that in which a rectangular space is cut into the vertical face of the rock, after the manner of an oven, extending six feet or more horizontally inwards, and sufficiently wide and high to admit of a corpse being pushed in. The opening is closed by a stone slab or by a rough unhewn mass of rock. Such a grave is called in the Talmud a " kok " (pi. " kokim "). A fourth kind of tomb is the " shelf grave "- — a shelf or bench, six feet long, cut in the vertical face of the rock, upon which the corpse was laid even when it had first been placed in a sarcophagus. The most common description of tomb is that in which a number of kokim, shelf, or trough graves are grouped together in one or more chambers of the same excavation. These tombs may be divided into three classes. The first class is that in which a natural cavern in one of the softer strata of limestone is adapted to sepulchral purposes. Kokim are cut in the sides of the cave, with their beds on a level with the ground, and the openings are then closed with rough stone slabs resting against the face of the rock or fitting more closely into the excavation. In this class of tomb no arrangement was made for closing the entrance to the cavern. It seems not improbable that these tombs were used for the burial of the poor, and they were perhaps constructed at the public expense. In the second class of tomb a square or oblong chamber is carefully cut in the solid rock ; the entrance is by a low square opening, closed either by a closely fitting stone slab or by a stone door turning on a socket hinge and secured by bolts on the inside. These tombs, remarkable for the care which has been bestowed on the excavation, were probably the family vaults of wealthy people. The third class of tomb is that in which one entrance leads to several tomb-chambers, each containing a large number of graves, and sometimes sarcophagi.