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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 94
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 94. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 94. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 94, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 94
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_111.jpg
Transcript 94 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. peace/ Again the procession advanced. The road descends a slight declivity, and the dim of the city is again withdrawn behind the intervening ridge of Olivet. A few moments a d the path mounts again ; it climbs a rugged ascent, it reaches a ledge of smooth rock, and in instant the whole city bursts into view. As now the dome of the Mosque El Aksa rises lik < a ghost from the earth before the traveller who stands on the ledge, so then must have rise the Temple tower; as now the vast enclosure of the Mussulman sanctuary, so then must have spread the Temple courts; as now the gray town on its broken hills, so then the magnificent city, with its background—long since vanished away—of gardens and suburbs on the western plateau behind. Immediately below was the Valley of the Kedron, here seen in its greatest depths as it joins the Valley of Hinnom, and thus giving full effect to the great peculiarity of Jerusalem, seen only on its eastern side—its situation as of a city rising out of a deep abyss It is hardly possible to doubt that this rise and turn of the road—this rocky ledge was the exact point where the multitude paused again, and ' He, when He beheld the city, wept over it.' " The road from Bethany to Jerusalem leaves Siloam (Silwan) on the left. This village (see pages 85, 115), which derives its name from the pool at the mouth of the Tyropoeon Valley, stretches north and south in a straggling, irregular manner along the lower slopes of the Mount of Offence. Entering the village at the northern end, the visitor has on his left hand a high cliff, which was evidently worked as a quarry at some early period. The houses and the streets of Siloam, if such they may be called, are filthy in the extreme, and the villagers are notorious thieves, sometimes not over-courteous to visitors. Their principal occupation is carrying water from " Job's Well" for sale in Jerusalem, and they have an ingenious way of blowing out the sheepskins in which the water is carried, so that they may appear filled when containing only half the proper quantity of water. About one hundred of the villagers form a group apart from the rest, called " men of Dhiban," the descendants apparently of a colony from the capital of King Mesha, which at some remote period crossed the Jordan and established itself on the borders of Kedron. Siloam, the village, is unmen- tioned in ancient times, but it may possibly mark the spot upon which Solomon built high places " for Ashtoreth the abomination of the Zidonians, and for Chemosh the abomination of the Moabites, and for Milcom (Molech) the abomination of the children of Ammon." The Mount of Offence (see page 107) behind the village would in this case be the " mount of corruption" of 2 Kings xxiii. 13, as it certainly is the " mons offensionis" of early travellers, the " opprobrious hill " of Milton. Jerusalem is surrounded by cemeteries, ancient and modern. Without the Zion Gate, near the tomb of David, are those of the Latins, Greeks, and Armenians ; and here may be seen the grave of the ill-fated Irishman, Costigan, who, after having successfully descended Jordan in a boat, and reached the southern end of the Dead Sea, died in the Latin convent at Jerusalem. Here, too, a little to the south of the Latin cemetery, two members of tie American Mission, Dr. Dodge and Mrs. Thomson, were buried. The present Protestant