Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 88
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 88. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2293.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 88. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2293

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 88, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2293.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 88
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_104.jpg
Transcript m 88 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. tomb chamber. In its present state the chapel has little in common with the to h • the neighbourhood of Jerusalem. The Chapel of the Tomb of the Virgin was rebu'lt- Millicent, the wife of Fulke, fourth king of Jerusalem, since which time it has appare tl received little alteration. On the right-hand side of the road is the Garden of Gethsemane (see page 86), a sm 11 enclosure surrounded by a high wall. The ground is laid out in flower beds, which a carefully tended by a Franciscan monk; but the most interesting objects are the venerabl olive-trees, which are said to date from the time of Christ, and which may, in truth, be direct descendants of trees which grew in the same place at the time of the Crucifixion. A tradition at least as old as the fourth century, identifies this plot of ground with the garden to which Jesus was wont to retire with His disciples. The Church of the Ascension, on the Mount of Olives (see page 90), is a small octagonal chapel, surmounted by a circular drum and dome, standing in the centre of a paved court. The bases and capitals of the columns, taken from older buildings, are of white marble. At the east end of the open court the Greeks, Armenians, Syrians, and Copts have altars. A tradition connecting the Mount of Olives with our Lord's Ascension existed at a very early period, though in direct contradiction to the words of St. Luke, who says, "He led them out as far as Bethany, and He lifted up his hands and blessed them. And it came to pass, while He blessed them, He was parted from them and carried up into heaven." Eusebius mentions the large number of pilgrims who came from all parts of the world to worship on the Mount of Olives; and the Empress Helena, in erecting a basilica on the spot, about 333 a.d., only perpetuated the existing tradition. The road from the Mount of Olives to Bethany for about five hundred yards follows the south side of the hill; it then turns abruptly to the south and crosses the narrow ridge which joins the Mount of Olives to the hill above Bethany. Upon the ridge the Crusaders placed Bethphage (see page 92), and here, in 1877, the ruins of a mediaeval church, with its apse, were discovered, enclosing an isolated block of rock ornamented with paintings and inscriptions. The rock is about three feet high, and its position in the chapel, on the north side and probably between two columns of the nave, is remarkable. On the south side, facing Bethany, there is a fresco representing the raising of Lazarus ; on the north side, facing Olivet, the disciples are represented as having just obtained permission to take the ass and the foal; on the east face the subject of the fresco appears to have been the consecration of the chapel; and on the west, figures are seen bearing palm-branches, perhaps part of a fresco representing our Lord's triumphal entry into Jerusalem. The inscriptions may be ascribed beyond doubt to the twelfth century, and the name Bernard Witard occurs on one of the faces. In the cartulary of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre the' name of Johannes Guitarcl (Witard) is found, and Mons. Ganneau conjectures that Bernard belonged to the same family and defrayed the expenses of the monument. The paintings are sadly damaged, but they are said " to remind one of illuminations in a precious missal rather than an ordinary fresco drawn to hide the naked stone."