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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 84
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 84. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 84. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2289

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 84, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 84
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_100.jpg
Transcript 84 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the junction of David Street and Christian Street. The third or outer wall began "at the Tower Hippicus, whence it reached as far as the north quarter of the city and the Tower Psephinus, and then was so far extended till it came over against the monuments of Helena, which Helena was queen of Adiabene, the mother of Izates; it then extended farther to a great length, and passed by the sepulchral caverns of the kings, and bent again at the Tower of the Corner, at the monument which is called the Monument of the Fuller, and joined to the old wall at the valley called the Valley of Kedron." There were ninety towers, each twenty cubits wide, and for a height of twenty cubits built of solid masonry. From the remains of old foundations it is almost certain that the third wall followed the line of the present one. The " Caverns of the Kings " have been sometimes identified with the great stone quarries near the Damascus Gate. These quarries are of great extent, and were worked with a view of mining or getting out stone from what is locally known as the " Malaki" bed of limestone. The quarries are thus entirely subterranean, and they formerly extended some distance on each side of the present city wall. When that wall was first built it was protected by a rock- hewn ditch, and the workmen in forming this cut through the upper strata, and so divided the quarries into two parts; that on the north is now known as Jeremiah's Grotto, that on the south as the " Quarries," or " Cotton Grotto " (see page 96). At the same period an aqueduct which conveyed water from the north to the Temple area was also cut through. The entrance to the quarries is by a small hole between the roof of the cavern and the rubbish with which the ditch is filled. The floor falls considerably towards the south, in which direction the quarry extends for about two hundred yards, and the roof is supported at uncertain intervals by pillars of rock. The quarrymen appear to have worked in gangs of five or six ; the height of the stone determined the distance of the workmen from each other, and each man carried in a vertical cut four inches wide till he reached the required depth; the blocks were then separated by wooden wedges driven in and wetted so as to cause them to swell. In many places the stones have been left half cut out, and the marks of the chisel and pick are as fresh as if the quarry- men had only just left their work; even the black patches made by the smoke of the lamps are still visible. In one part of the quarry, dropping water, derived probably from the leakage of cisterns above, has worn the rock away into the form of a basin. The water is impure and unpleasant to the taste. The floor of the quarry is covered with stone chippings, which seem to indicate that the blocks of stone were " dressed" before they were removed from the ground, and large flakes of the overlying strata have fallen from the roof, the spaces left between the pillars being much too wide. The portion of the quarry known as Jeremiah's Grotto (see page 97) is much smaller, but there are evident traces that it was worked in the same manner. Two Moslem tombs are shown within, and according to tradition Jeremiah here wrote the Book of Lamentations. In front of the grotto is an open court planted with fruit trees, beneath which there is a fine cistern. One of the most pleasant excursions in the vicinity of Jerusalem is that to Bethany by the _^»__