Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 81
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 81. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2286.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 81. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2286

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 81, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2286.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 81
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_097.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 81 wall is built on the remains of an older one; there is here a great accumulation of rubbish, and near the gate the original features of the ground are entirely concealed. South of the Jaffa Gate lies the Citadel (see page 3), protected by its ditch; thence to the south-west angle and onwards to the Zion Gate the wall has been reconstructed with old material; and from the Zion Gate to the Dung Gate in the Tyropoeon Valley, and thence to the Double Gate, the wall is of the same character (see page 75). From the Double Gate to the Castle of Antonia, near St. Stephen's Gate, the wall of the Haram esh Sherif is also the city wall. How far the existing walls follow the course of the old walls of Jerusalem is a question that has often been asked, and it is one that it is extremely difficult to answer, owing to the limited information we possess respecting the actual nature of the topographical features of the ground. There are, however, certain points which may now be looked upon as certain, and, taking these as a starting-point, future excavations may complete the good work commenced by Captain Warren. Josephus describes the walls as follows. The first or old wall commenced on the north at the Tower Hippicus, and extended as far as the Xystus, and then, joining to the council-house, ended at the west cloister of the Temple. Going the other way; it also commenced at Hippicus, and, facing west, extended through a place called Bethso to the Gate of the Essenes ; after that it faced south, making a turn above the fountain of Siloam, where it also faced east at Solomon's Pool and reached as far as Ophlas, where it was joined to the eastern cloister of the Temple. In this wall there were sixty towers, each twenty cubits square. The first section of the wall, there can be little question, ran from the Jaffa Gate to the " Gate of the Chain " of the Haram esh Sherif, following a line a little to the south of, and nearly parallel to, David's Street. The second section of the wall is more difficult to trace. There is, however, in the Protestant cemetery, on the western slope of modern Zion, a remarkable excavation in the rock, which gives the line of the city wall thus far. The rock is here, for a distance of one hundred feet, scarped, or cut perpendicularly downwards, so as to have a cliff twenty-four feet high, on the top of which the old wall ran ; and there would appear to have been a succession of these scarps, with rock-terraces in front of them, to the bottom of the valley. A flight of rock-hewn steps led down from the wall above, and the position of three flanking towers can be recognised. Beyond the steps the rock scarp turns to the east, and there are traces of either a ditch or an entrance to the city. This point appears to have been the corner of the wall at or near which was the Gate of the Essenes. The farther course of the old wall and the place at which it crossed the Tyropoeon are unknown. The word Bethso (Dung Place) gives a clue to the route followed by Nehemiah when he went out by night to view the walls. He apparently left Jerusalem by the Jaffa Gate, Valley Gate, and rode to the Dung Gate, or Bethso ; he then went on to the Gate of the Fountain and to the King's Pool in the Tyropoeon Valley, but the deep narrow ravine was so encumbered with the rubbish of the fallen walls that there was no room for the beast that was under him to pass ; he therefore went up by the brook, the more open Kedron valley, and "viewed the wall, and turned back, and entered by the Gate of the Valley and so returned." In the account of the rebuilding of 12