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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 80
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 80. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 80. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2285

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 80, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2285.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 80
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_096.jpg
Transcript 80 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Robinson's Arch, Barclay's Gate, and Wilson's Arch are identified with three of the Luc. west gates of the Temple, and the Double Gate with the Huldah Gate on the south. The It- is placed near the fountain El Kas, in front of the Mosque El Aksa (see vignette). Cant ' Warren, R.E., considers that the outer courts of the Temple of Herod are defined bv th east, west, and south walls of the Haram esh Sherif, and by the northern edge of the rais H platform of the Dome of the Rock. He places the altar over the west end of the curio cruciform cistern beneath the platform. Count de Vogue, Mons. de Saulcy, Sir Henry James Dr. Sepp, and others, believe that the entire surface of the Haram enclosure was occupied bv the Temple, its courts and cloisters. Drs. Robinson and Barclay, Professors Porter and Kiepert, maintain that the Temple enclosure was a square of about nine hundred and twenty- five feet, situated in the southern portion of the Haram. Drs. Tobler and Rosen believe that the Temple was a square of six hundred feet, nearly coincident with the platform of the Dome of the Rock. In these last cases the altar is placed on the Sakhra. With regard to the position of Antonia all differ. The questions are such as can only be settled definitely by excavation ; but, so far as we can judge at present, Mr. Fergusson's theory of the Temple site most nearly accords with what is known of the features of the ground and with the wrritten description of Josephus. From the Haram esh Sherif we may pass out of the city by the " Gate of the Tribes" and "St. Stephen's Gate," and commence an examination of the modern walls of Jerusalem, which were built by Sultan Suleiman in the sixteenth century. F/*om the gate of St. Stephen to Burj Laklak, " Stork Tower," at the north-east angle, the wall is partly protected by a ditch excavated in the rock, and the bases of the flanking towers, thirty-two feet wide, are also rock-hewn. Between Burj Laklak and the Damascus Gate in the north wall there is a similar ditch cut in the rock, and between these two points there is also a closed gateway known as the " Gate of Herod," but more properly called the " Gate of Splendour, or Blooming." Near the latter gate the ditch is of considerable depth, a feature which probably marks the original entrance to the quarries (see page 93). From the Damascus Gate to the north-west angle of the city, in which " Goliath's Castle " stands, the wall appears to have been built on the foundations of an older one; material of all kinds has been used in its construction, and at one point the Moslem builders have made a curious attempt to assimilate the older work to their masonry by cutting false joints in the stones of the former. The wall was protected by a ditch cut in the rock, but it is now almost filled with rubbish. The ruin known as " Goliath s Castle " is an old tower of rubble masonry, partly faced with stone having a marginal draft. Within the tower there is a modern chamber, and beneath it an older one with two piers, which are supposed by some writers to be Herodian ; they are, however, more probably Crusading or Saracenic. The castle has been identified with the octagonal tower of Psephinus, mentioned by Josephus, but it is more probably the Tower of Tancred, mentioned in the histories of the Crusades. There seems evidence, too, that the castle is built on the foundations of one of the old walls of the city. From the north-west angle to the Jaffa Gate tie