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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 78
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 78. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2283.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 78. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2283

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 78, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2283.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 78
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_094.jpg
Transcript 78 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. each side probably about two hundred and ten cubits, and surrounded by a wall thi and a half feet high on the inside. In this wall there were seven gates : on the u Gate Nitzus, the Gate of Offering, and the Gate Mokad ; on the south the Gate of Fl the Gate of Offering, and the Water Gate, which opened directly on the altar and to have been in continuation of the Huldah Gate; and on the east was the Beautiful G Gate Nicanor of the Talmud. In addition to the above, three gates led into the Court of x\\ Women, one on the north, another on the south, and a third on the east. On each side f the gateways there were chambers which were used as stores, &c, in connection with th Temple service. Nine of these gates "were on every side covered over with gold and silve as were the jambs of their doors and their lintels." The Beautiful Gate was of Corinthian brass, and ornamented in the most costly manner with richer and thicker plates of o-0ld than the other gates. Within the wall of the Inner Temple enclosure were the Temple with its altar, the Court of the Men of Israel, and the Court of the Priests. In the Temple, as reconstructed by Herod, the Holy of Holies "remained a cube of twenty cubits, and occupied the same place as it had from Solomon's days. The Holy Place was forty cubits east and by twenty cubits across, and thirty cubits high, as before." The porch was eleven cubits wide by "apparently fifty cubits north and south, bounded on the east by a wall five cubits thick, while one six cubits in thickness separated it from the Holy Place, making twenty-two cubits in all." The facade of the Temple was one hundred cubits long, and in front of it, at the top of a flight of steps leading down to the Court of the Priests, stood the Toran, or screen bearing the golden vine. The Temple was partly surrounded by thirty-eight little chambers, " fifteen in the north, fifteen in the south, and eight in the west. The northern and southern ones were (placed) five over five, and five over them ; and in the west three over three and two over them. To each were three doors : one to the little chamber to the right, one to the little chamber to the left, and one to the little chamber over it." Internally the Temple was divided into the Holy Place—in which there were " three things that were very wonderful and famous among all mankind, the candlestick, the table (of shewbread), and the altar of incense \ —and the Holy of Holies, inaccessible and inviolable, in which nothing was kept. The veil of the Temple is stated to have been a " Babylonian curtain, embroidered with blue, and fine linen, and scarlet, and purple," and of a very fine texture. The colours were symbolical of the universe : the scarlet and blue represented, by means of their colours, fire and air; the fine linen, earth, by the flax of which it was made; and the purple, the sea, from the circumstance that the dye was obtained from salt-water shell-fish. Upon the curtain was also embroidered " all that was mystical in the heavens, except the twelve signs of the zodiac representing living creatures." There is much divergence in the views of the writers who have attempted to reconstruci the Temple and fix its position within the Haram enclosure. Mr. Fergusson supposes the Temple to have occupied a square of about six hundred feet at the south-west angle ot Haram esh Sherif, and he is followed in this by Messrs. Thrupp, Lewin, and others.