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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 76
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 76. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2281.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 76. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2281

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 76, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2281.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 76
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_092.jpg
Transcript 76 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. " Through it one could see the high-priest who burned the heifer and all his assistants ' out to the Mount of Olives." The south side had "gates in its middle "—the Huldah C that served for going in and out—which there is little difficulty in identifying with "Double Gate" beneath the Mosque El Aksa. The walls of the Temple enclosure were surmounted by cloisters of great mao-nific On the north, west, and east the cloisters were double, with monolithic columns of r marble and roofs of curiously carved cedar. On the south were the royal cloisters Si- Basilica, which consisted of one hundred and sixty-two columns with Corinthian capital arranged in four rows so as to form three aisles. The outer row of columns was attached t the wall; the remaining columns stood free; and the size of each was such " that three men might, with their arms extended, fathom it round and join their hands again." The centre aisle was forty-five feet, and each of the side aisles thirty feet wide, and the " roofs were adorned with deep sculptures in wood, representing many sorts of figures. The middle was much higher than the rest, and the wall of the front was adorned with beams, resting upon pillars that were interwoven into it, and that front was all of polished stone; insomuch that its fineness to such as had not seen it was incredible, and to such as had seen it was greatly amazing." The cloisters were separated from the steps which, led up to the Inner Temple by an open space which is supposed to have been from twenty-four to thirty cubits wide, the width varying on each side of the Temple. The cloisters and Court of the Gentiles formed the Outer Temple, and it was this portion of the building which our Lord characterized as a den of thieves. Here, as in a market-place, were assembled those who bought and sold, and here stood the tables of the money-changers and those who sold doves. Here the Jew who had come from some Gentile nation could change the foreign money he had brought with him into Jewish coin, which could alone be paid into the Temple treasury, and here turtle-doves and young pigeons could be purchased for sacrifice. The whole or a portion of the eastern cloister was called Solomon's Porch. Here Jesus was accustomed to walk; and it was here, too, that the people ran together and surrounded Peter and John after they had healed the lame man. From the Court of the Gentiles a few steps led up to a flat terrace called the Chel, on the outer edge of which ran a stone screen or partition, three cubits high, of very elegant construction. Upon the screen " stood pillars, at equal distances from one another, declaring the law of purity, some in Greek and some in Roman letters, that no foreigner should go within that sanctuary " on pain of death. It was one of the inscriptions from these pillars which, as previously mentioned, was found by Mons. Ganneau. The Chel on the north, west, and south was ten cubits wide; but on the east, in front of the Temple, it was of greater width, and formed a rectangular space surrounded by a wall of its own, called the Court of ti< Women. Such as were pure were allowed to enter this court with their wives, but t < women were not allowed to pass beyond. From the Chel other steps led up through gates to the Inner Temple, which was square