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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 74
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 74. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 74. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2279

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 74, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 74
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_090.jpg
Transcript 74 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. to the altar of a church. One of the cisterns north of the Dome of the Rock is 'H by Captain Warren with the passage which led from the Gate Nitsots to the Gate T A' the Temple, and by Mr. Fergusson with a passage connecting the Anastasis with the B T of Constantine; and another cistern is believed by the former gentleman to be part f passage from the Temple gate Mokad. The cisterns being covered in, they must always have kept the water cool and pleas the taste, and there could have been but slight loss from evaporation. The aqueduct A ' K supplied the cisterns with water crosses the Tyropoeon Valley on the viaduct of wh' h Wilson's Arch forms a part, and enters the Haram at the Gate of the Chain. Hence th principal branch runs to a fountain called El Kas (the Cup), nearly midway between the Dome of the Rock and El Aksa (see vignette), and close to the site assigned by Mr. Fergusson to the Jewish altar. From El Kas smaller conduits lead to the cisterns in the southern half of the Haram. The description of the Haram esh Sherif which has been given above will, it is hoped enable the reader to picture to himself the present state of Mount Moriah and the character of the buildings that now occupy its surface. A few notes on the Temple and the various theories with regard to its position may now be added. The altar of David was erected on the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite, and the succeeding altars of the Jews were set up on the same spot until the capture and destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans. If, then, the site of the altar of Herod's Temple could be ascertained, the Temple questions would at once be solved. Of Herod's Temple there are detailed descriptions in Josephus and the Talmud, but unfortunately the question of its position is greatly complicated by the literal fulfilment of the prophecy that not one stone should be left upon another. The Temple which Herod commenced to build in the sixteenth year of his reign was, according to Josephus, a square of six hundred feet. This is distinctly stated in three separate passages: in Ant. xv. n, 3 the enclosure is said to be four stadii in circuit, each side measuring one stadium in length ; in Ant. xv. 11, 5 the Stoa Basilica is described as extending " from the east valley to that on the west, for it was impossible it should reach any farther," and as being one stadium long; and again in Ant. xx. 9, 7 the length of the eastern cloister of the outer court is given as four hundred cubits, that is one stadium, or six hundred feet. If the dimensions had been mentioned once only it would be possible to suppose that an error had been made, but it is almost impossible to believe that the same mistake could occur in three different places, or that Josephus, who knew very well what a stadium was, should declare the Stoa Basilica to be one stadium long when it was one and a half, as it would have been had the cloisters extended the full length of the south wall of the Haram. The gates of the Temple enclosure were as follows : on the west there were four gates; the first " le to the King's palace and went to a passage over the intermediate valley," a description w agrees well with the gate at the end of Wilson's Arch, from which a street now runs in almos a direct line to the site occupied by Herod's Palace, over the old Tyropoeon viaduct.