Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 70
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 70. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2275.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 70. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2275

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 70, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2275.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 70
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_086.jpg
Transcript 7o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. The floor of the Golden Gate is much below the level of the Haram, and the Hn ■ ■ uoor which gives access to the interior is at the foot of a steep slope of rubbish. The ro f ' comparatively late construction, but the body of the work is in a good state of preser * the finer parts of the sculpture having been protected by a coat of plaster, which was at ***- some time put on to conceal it. A quasi-classical cornice runs along the wall on both sides f \ interior. The style is identical with that of the decorated arch over the " Double Gate " also with the portion of an old cornice which is built into the fa$ade of the Church of th Holy Sepulchre. In the capital of the pilaster at the north-east corner a variation ' produced by looping up the acanthus leaves with a cord. The two columns in the inter' " are boldly and originally Byzantine, according neither with the corresponding pilasters ' the wall, nor with anything else of that age." The arches spring directly from the architrave blocks and support flat domes with pendentives. Externally the entire entablature architrave, frieze, and cornice are bent, as at Spalatro, and arching from pillar to pillar- peculiarity which is said not to be found in any building after the fourth century. The two free-standing columns in the interior are said by Moslem tradition to have been brought on her shoulders by the Queen of Sheba as a present to King Solomon. Through the gateway itself, at the last day, the good will pass on their way to the houris of Paradise, after having safely crossed the Kedron on that bridge which is sharper than the sharpest sword; and through the same portal, according to a very generally received belief, the Christian prince who retakes Jerusalem will make his public entry. The belief that the Christians will recapture the city, and that their own tenure of the country is drawing to a close, is widely spread amongst the Moslems in Palestine. Mr. Fergusson believes the Golden Gate to be the " festal portal which Eusebius describes Constantine as erecting in front of his basilica." Count de Vogtie, on the other hand, considers it to be a building of the fifth or sixth century, erected by the Christians, as the Beautiful Gate of the Temple— the Nicanor of the Talmud—to commemorate the miracle therein performed by St. Peter and St. John in curing the lame man, as narrated in the third chapter of the Acts of the Apostles. North of the Golden Gate is a small modern building called " Solomon's Chair," which contains a sort of cenotaph covered with carpets and cloths. The Moslems attach peculiar sanctity to the place, and visit it every year at the Feast of Bairam. Tradition relates that Solomon died here, and supported himself on his staff to conceal his death from the demons. In course of time, however, the staff became worm-eaten and the body fell, much to the delight of the demons, who then for the first time became aware that they were freed from the king's authority. Many small buildings are scattered over the surface of the Haram esh Sherif (see page 53). One which merits especial notice is that called Saladin's Fountain, or, more properly, the Fountain of Kait Bey, near the " Cotton Gate." According to the inscription, this beautiful little building was erected by Melek el Ashraf Abu Nasir Kait Bey in the year 849 of the Hegira (a.d. 1445). The dome is entirely covered with arabesques in