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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 68
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 68. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 68. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2273

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 68, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2273.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 68
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_084.jpg
Transcript 68 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. found there a door opening into delicious gardens. Having walked through the f time he plucked a leaf from one of the trees, placed it behind his ear, and hasten d h to tell his companions. The matter was reported to the Governor, who sent- M* ilL 11Js servants with the stranger to see these remarkable subterranean gardens; but no door could be f Omar was written to, and he at once replied that the prophecy of Mohammed wa« v> db now literally fulfilled, because a living man had walked into Paradise. To test the matte settle all doubts he desired them to examine the leaf, and if it still remained green a d fresh there could be no doubt that it came from Paradise. The leaf had, of course, preserved its verdure." At the south-east corner of the Mosque el Aksa an open doorway leads to the "Mosque of Omar," a long low building with pointed arches. In its south wall is the Mihrab of Omar, which, according to the existing tradition, marks the place where Omar first prayed after he entered Jerusalem. On either side of the mihrab is a twisted column with a rich grotesquely carved capital. The capitals were exposed to view a few years ago, but have since been covered with plaster. They evidently belonged to some building or altar erected by the Crusaders. Much confusion has arisen from the transfer of the name of this mosque to the Dome of the Rock, for which there is no authority either in history or local tradition. A flight of steps outside the principal entrance to the Mosque el Aksa leads down to the " Double Passage," which runs beneath the building to the " Double Gate," in the south wall of the Haram esh Sherif. The Double Gateway leads into a vestibule measuring thirty feet by forty feet, in the centre of which stands a fine monolithic column with a Corinthian capital of beautiful design. It consists of alternate leaves of the acanthus and water-lily, without any volutes or any of the accompaniments of the later Corinthian order. From its summit spring four flat arches, dividing the roof into four compartments, each of which is roofed by a low flat dome. The sides of the vestibule were originally built with stones ornamented by a marginal draft, but at some period of reconstruction the masonry was cut away to give relief to the pilasters opposite the monolith, and the drafts disappeared. The two entrances of the Double Gate are separated by a pier, upon which the ends of the great lintels which cover the openings rest. Above the lintels there are relieving arches, and over these a cornice. The Double Passage is reached by a flight of steps at the end of the western vault. It is covered by well-built semicircular arches, and its walls, as far as the third pier, are ot ancient masonry; beyond that point the masonry is of a mixed character. The ascent to the Haram esh Sherif is now easy, but it was at one time much more rapid, and the conduit connecting the "Well of the Leaf" with the aqueduct from Solomon's Pools was cut through when the passage was reconstructed in its present form. The vestibule is undoubtedly a portion of Herod's Temple, and the great monolithic column in its centre corresponds in position with one of the pillars in the Royal Cloisters, which ran along