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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 64
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 64. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2269.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 64. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2269

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 64, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2269.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 64
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_080.jpg
Transcript 64 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. him the choir, and on the left of the choir the Chapels of the " Presentation of Ch ' ' and of "Jacob's Dream." Over the one was written the couplet— and over the other— ' Hie fuit oblatus rex regurft virgine natus, Qua propter sanctus locus est hie jure vocatus; ' Hie Jacob scalam vidit, construxit et aram, Hinc locus ornatur, quo sanctus jure vocatur." The cave was at the same time converted into a chapel, ornamented with paintings and inscriptions commemorative of the appearance of the angel to Zacharias, and of the woman taken in adultery who was brought before Jesus. On the day of the Purification a solemn procession passed through the city from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre to the Templum Domini (Dome of the Rock) ; and on the occasion of the coronation of the Frank kings of Jerusalem a similar procession took place. According to the prescribed ceremonial the king was crowned in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre; he then proceeded to the Templum Domini to offer his crown on the altar of the Chapel of the Presentation of Christ, and afterwards passed to the Templum Salomonis (Mosque el Aksa), where the Knights Templars had their residence. Whilst the repairs were being executed in 1873, several fragments of figures and other memorials were found of the occupation of the Dome of the Rock by the Crusaders. What is the origin of this beautiful building ? To this question no decisive answer has yet been made. Mr. Fergusson, arguing chiefly on architectural grounds—and his arguments have never been answered by any one competent to deal with this side of the problem—maintains that the Dome of the Rock is in all essential particulars the identical Anastasis, or Church of the Resurrection, built by the Emperor Constantine over the cave which he believed to be the Sepulchre of Christ. He is also absolutely convinced that the "new sepulchre" was near this spot, probably in this very rock and under the very dome. Mr. Fergusson places the Basilica of Constantine on the north side of the platform of the mosque; and he considers a souterrain discovered by Captain Warren to be part of one of the double aisles of that building, which Eusebius describes as partly above ground and partly beneath it. The conclusions arrived at by a committee of architects and engineers, who considered the question at Munich, seem to have been that the Dome of the Rock was not an old Arab building, and that it could not have been built by Constantine or later than the reign of Justinian. The view of the committee was that the evidence laid before them tended to show that the building could only belong to the first third of the sixth century. The Arab historians attribute the erection of the Dome of the Rock to Abd el Melik, and this is the view generally taken of its origin. The essentially Byzantine character of the building is explained by the supposition that Abd el Melik employed a Greek architect, the Arabs at that time having no style of their own. It is somewhat surprising, however, to find that, though the Arabs cam'