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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 62
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 62. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 62. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2267

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 62, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 62
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_078.jpg
Transcript 6*2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. south-east corner of the rock; a flight of steps passes under an archway and leads d to the chamber. The average height of the cave is six feet. In the roof is a circul opening which pierces the rock; the floor is paved with marble, and the sides covered with plaster and whitewash. The floor, when stamped upon, gives out a hollo sound, indicating the presence of a lower chamber, possibly a well, the " Well of Spirits The sides, too, when tapped give forth a hollow sound, which the Moslem guardian brings forward as a proof that the Sakhra is, in accordance with the legend, suspended in the air. Many curious traditions are attached to the Dome of the Rock. Immediately within the "Gate of Paradise" is the "Sepulchre of Solomon." A small piece of marble, called the " Flagstone of Paradise," is let into the pavement above the tomb. Into this marble Mohammed drove nails, which at certain intervals drop through to the tomb below; when they have all disappeared the prophet will come to judge the faithful. Three nails now remain perfect, and one has sunk some depth. The place has a weird interest to the Moslem pilgrim, who approaches it with cautious step, mindful of the grave advice of the attendant sheikh, " Take heed to thy footsteps, O pilgrim ! lest thou shake a nail through and hasten the day of judgment." Near the west side of the rock is preserved the shield of Hamzeh, the uncle of Omar. The shield is of very beautiful workmanship, and is, perhaps, of Persian manufacture. Its face is highly ornamented with figures of birds and animals in low relief, the peacock being most prominent; but it has been flattened in and turned towards the wall to conceal the forbidden figures from devout eyes. It is, however, round the mysterious rock that the legends gather most thickly. On the Sakhra, if we are to believe certain traditions, Melchizedek offered sacrifice ; there Abraham was about to offer Isaac; there Jacob saw the ladder leading up into heaven ; and there, too, was the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite, by which the angel stood when he stretched out his hand upon Jerusalem to destroy it; the site of the " altar of the burnt-offering for Israel," upon which David sacrificed ; the altar of the Temples of Solomon, Zerubbabel, and Herod. Here Mohammed prayed, declaring that one prayer by the sacred rock was better than a thousand elsewhere, and hence he passed heavenward on his mysterious steed, Al Borak. At the south-west corner of the rock may still be seen the " Footprint of Mohammed," covered by a rude shrine, which contains, carefully screened from vulgar eyes, an object of the deepest veneration, a single hair of the prophet's head. Here, too, are the banners of Omar, which were carried before him when he captured Jerusalem: they are now covered with cases which do not seem to have been removed for years. When the Crusaders converted the Dome of the Rock into their' Templum Domini they formed a choir in the centre, which was probably co-extensive with the inner circle of piers and columns, and placed the high altar on the Sakhra, which was covered with marble slabs and decorated with sculptured figures in marble. The principal entrance wa at that time by the western door, on passing through which the visitor had in front