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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 58
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 58. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2263.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 58. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2263

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 58, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2263.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 58
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_074.jpg
Transcript 58 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. When the Crusaders reached Jerusalem it is said that they found the Dome f Rock covered with inscriptions in the Cufic character, which stated that the buildino- v, been erected by Omar. These have disappeared, as well as the Latin inscriptions with wh' 1, the mosque was adorned, inside and outside, during the Christian occupation of the H 1 City. One of these inscriptions, which commenced " Domus mea domus orationis vocabit dicit Dominus," occupied, if our interpretation of the description of Theodoricus is cor the place of the great Cufic inscription. The aisles are covered by slightly sloping roofs with panelled wooden ceilings, and paved with mosaics formed of old material, amongst which there are many fragments of sculptured slabs. The bases and columns of the inner circle are similar to those of the octagonal screen ■ the capitals differ in size, in outline, and in details, and in their state of preservation; but in most cases the volutes and acanthus leaves have been much defaced, the projecting ed?es having been knocked off. The columns and piers are connected by a fine wrought-iron screen which is said to be of French workmanship of the latter part of the twelfth century, and believed to be a relic of the Crusaders (see page 59). A fragment of the choir of the old Christian church (Templum Domini) also remains. The discharging arches, which spring directly from the capitals, are covered with a thin veneering of marble, black and white slabs arranged. alternately. Above the arches is the drum upon which the dome rests, divided into what may be called the triforium and clerestory by a slight cornice. The former is ornamented by a band of scrollwork in glass mosaics, which in many of its features is late Roman. The clerestory is pierced by sixteen windows, between each of which the scroll of the triforium is repeated with some slight variations. Mons. Ganneau ascertained that on many of the vertical walls of the interior " the coloured and gilded little cubes of glass which produce together so marvellous an effect are not sunk in the walls so that their faces are vertical, but are placed obliquely, so that the faces make an angle with the walls. This ingenious inclination is evidently intended to present their many-coloured facets at the most effective angle of incidence to the eye below." This system of decoration produces a dazzling and magical effect, which must be seen to be perfectly realised. According to Mr. Fergusson, the history of the mosaic decoration is as follows : " When the building was first erected by Constantine he adorned it, internally at least, with mosaics, portions of which still remain. When the Saracens took possession of the Dome of the Rock they destroyed those parts of these mosaics representing emblems offensive to Moslem ideas, and replaced them by those others which we now see. When the Christians regained possession of the building in 1099 they obliterated the Saracenic inscriptions and replace them by the Latin ones, copied and published by John of Wiirzburg and Theodoricus Lastly, when the Moslems recovered the Kubbet es Sakhra, Saladin, or some one abo his time, obliterated the Christian inscriptions, remodelled entirely the mosaics of the aisles at least, and inserted the Cufic inscriptions, which ascribe the erection of the bin C1 to Abd el Melik or El Mamiin."