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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 55
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 55. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2260.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 55. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2260

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 55, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2260.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 55
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_071.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 55 Crusades, will bear no other interpretation." Some of these arcades were at one time formed into semicircular niches with semi-domical heads, and the upper parts at least were richly ornamented with mosaics in coloured and gilt glass. The presence of mosaics outside the Kubbet es Sakhra is a fact of much interest in the history of the building, because it has been often doubted, in spite of the formal affirmation of the ancient descriptions. From John of Wurzburg to Mejr ed Din, all writers agree in saying that the Dome of the Rock was adorned with mosaics inside and outside. The last trace of this system of decoration disappeared from the outside when the faience was applied in the sixteenth century. Mons. Ganneau considers the mosaics to be "the work of the Arabs, perhaps that of Saladin." On the other hand, Mr. Fergusson, from whose valuable works our description of the mosque is chiefly compiled, believes the mosaics to be late Roman or Byzantine, and thinks it not improbable that they may be part of the original design of the building, assuming it to have been erected in the fourth century. The external walls above the basement are entirely covered with tiles, which produce a very fine effect. Verses of the Koran, beautifully written in interwoven character, in blue and white, run round the parapet wall, and beneath are elaborately executed designs in various colours. The tiles are nine and a half inches square and firmly embedded in mortar. Three periods of workmanship can be traced : the tiles of the earliest period are far superior to the others in elegance of design and quality of workmanship ; those of the second are also good ; but the tiles of the third period are in bad taste and of inferior quality. They have been chiefly used in recent repairs. The aisle screen is perhaps the most interesting part of the building, and it is that upon which the architectural arguments with reference to the age of the Dome of the Rock are chiefly founded. The bases of the columns are cased with slabs of marble, but they were uncovered during the repairs, and it was then found that, though classical in form, they differed in outline and height. This, however, is not an unusual occurrence in early Christian churches, for the builders made free use of columns, capitals, and bases taken from pagan temples. The shafts of the columns do not rest immediately on their bases, but on sheets of lead from three-quarters of an inch to one and a half inches thick. The capitals are of the Corinthian order, and they illustrate " one of the very first attempts to convert the hollow bowl of the Corinthian capital into a fuller form, to bear an arch or a longer entablature." The entablature, although of wood, would have looked crushingly heavy if maintaining its classical depth, across pillars spaced eight diameters apart. The architrave is consequently omitted and represented only by a square block of stone over each pillar, supporting the frieze and cornice, of fairly classical design ; and over this comes a bold discharging arch, which again supports a cornice, originally apparently classical, but now hidden in more modern details of stone. The stone blocks are cased with marble slabs, which seem at one time to have been covered with bronze plates. The wood entablature is painted in bright colours, to bring out the details of the beautiful frieze and cornice, and its soffit and part of its side are covered with bronze repousst work of a very elaborate and beautiful class.