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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 47
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 47. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2252.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 47. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2252

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 47, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2252.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 47
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_063.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 47 so much attention. The letters are either cut into or painted on the stones. The incised characters are cut to a depth of three-eighths of an inch ; the painted characters, some of which are five inches high, were probably put on with a brush. They are in red paint, apparently vermilion, and easily rubbed off with a wetted finger. These graphiti were examined by the late Mr. Emanuel Deutsch, who says : " The signs cut or painted were on the stones when they were first laid in their present places. They do not represent any inscription. They are Phoenician. I consider them to be partly letters, partly numerals, and partly special quarry signs or masons' marks. Some of them were recognisable at once as well-known Phoenician characters; others, hitherto unknown in Phoenician epigraphy, I had the rare satisfaction of being able to identify on absolutely undoubted Phoenician structures in Syria." The pottery obtained during the excavations consisted of a small jar found in a hole cut out of the rock, " standing upright, as though it had been purposely placed there," and many fragments of lamps and other utensils. Dr. Birch, the keeper of oriental antiquities at the British Museum, states that it is just possible that this jar, which resembles Egyptian ware in shape, might be as old as the fourth or fifth century B.C. Mr. Greville Chester, the well- known antiquary, observes, in the " Recovery of Jerusalem," that the vase " is of pale red ware, and of a common Graeco-Phcenician type." Amongst the fragments were found several broken lamps of red or brownish ware, with one, two, or three lips, which " seem adapted for the burning of fat rather than oil." They are similar in design to lamps that have been found in Cyprus and Malta; and Mr. A. W. Franks, of the British Museum, considers them " to be of late date—not earlier than the second century before the Christian era." The south-east angle is by some writers believed to be one of the oldest portions of the wall and the work of Solomon ; whilst others, from the peculiar character of the masonry, believe it to have been built by Herod Agrippa, or to be even as late as the reign of Justinian. The most remarkable features of the south wall of the Haram esh Sherif are the large stones known as the " Great Course," and the Single, Double, and Triple Gates. The "Great Course " is a course of drafted stones about six feet high, which extends continuously for a distance of seventy feet west of the south-east angle, and can be traced thence at intervals to the Triple Gate. The stones have sometimes been supposed to be of great age, but in our opinion they are more probably connected with the great works which were undertaken at Jerusalem by order of Justinian. Procopius, in describing the Mary Church of Justinian, says that the fourth part of the ground required for the building was wanting towards the south and east; the builders, therefore, laid out their foundations at the extremity of the sloping ground, and raised up a wall until they reached the pitch of the hill. Above this they constructed a series of arched vaults, by means of which they raised the ground to the level of the rest of the enclosure. Procopius also speaks of the immense size of the stones and of the skill with which they were dressed. This describes exactly what is found at the southeast ano-le : solid masonry to the level of the top of the hill under the Triple Gate, then vaults to raise the level to that of the area, and the " Great Course " to mark the end of the solid