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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 46
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 46. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 46. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2251

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 46, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 46
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_062.jpg
Transcript 46 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. height of thirty-five feet above the floor. At the west end are two parallel passages ru * westwards along the Haram wall, whence a flight of irregular steps leads down to the the east end is closed by a dam forty-five feet thick, which is also part of the citv - 11 No trace has yet been found of the system of conduits by which it was supplied with \v North of the Birket Israil (see page 66) is the street leading to St. Stephen's Gate, and imi diately beyond it the Church of St. Anne, which was given by the Sultan Abdul Mejid to th French Emperor on the termination of the Crimean war. The church is built over theGrott of St. Anne, an excavation in the rock remarkably like an old cistern, which is claimed h tradition as the home of St. Anne and the birthplace of the Virgin Mary. The buildino- has been thoroughly repaired by the French, who have made no material alterations in the original edifice left by the Crusaders, and who have retained traces of the Moslem occupation in an Arabic inscription over the doorway and the mihrab, or prayer niche, which was cut in the south wall. The St. Stephen's Gate is called by the native Christians Bab Sitti Mariam (Gate of Our Lady Mary), from the circumstance that the road which passes through it leads to the tomb of the Virgin in the valley below. It dates from the restoration of the city walls by Sultan Suleiman. Above the doorway are two lions sculptured in stone in low relief. The first point of interest in the east wall of the Haram esh Sherif is the Golden Gate, an entrance to the sacred enclosure which has long been closed, in consequence of a Moslem tradition that when the Christians capture Jerusalem they will make their triumphal entry by it. South of the Golden Gate is a postern, now closed with masonry, which is called by the Ar#b historian,Mejr ed Din, the Gate of Borak. Beside it there are traces of an old fountain, once probably fed from the water in the cisterns of the Haram. From St. Stephen's Gate to the postern, and even beyond it, the ground at the foot of the east wall is occupied by the Mohammedan cemetery, and closely covered with tombs- plain rectangular masses of masonry with rounded tops ; they are generally badly built and soon fall to pieces, leaving nothing but a heap of ruins. Here and there may be seen a head stone with a roughly, hewn turban, and in some cases the tombs are protected from the weather by a square building pierced with arches and surmounted by a dome (see pages 67 and 69). Moslem funerals pass into the Haram esh Sherif by the " Gate of the Tribes," and enter the Dome of the Rock by the " Gate of Paradise." After a few short prayers the procession passes out of the mosque by the gate that opens in the direction of Mecca, and leaves the Haram by the way it entered ; it then proceeds to the grave. No coffin is used; the body is simply wrapped in a sheet and carried to the grave in a wooden box by six men. A man bearing a palm branch heads the procession, and the mourners follow the body in a confused crowd without any order or arrangement. At the grave a few verses of the Koran are recited, and if the deceased is rich alms are distributed to the poor. The imposing mass of masonry at the south-east angle of the Haram esh Shent, which overhangs the Kedron valley, has always excited the admiration of travellers. Its foundation-stones bear the Phoenician letters which at the .time of their discovery attracte