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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 42
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 42. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 42. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2247

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 42, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 42
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_058.jpg
Transcript 42 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Upper City to the Temple area, and attempted to escape by appearing as a ghost to the Roman soldiers in the place where the Temple had stood. The principal approach to the Haram esh Sherif is by David Street, which passes over Wilson's Arch and enters the enclosure on a level, through a handsome double gate, of which the southern portal is called Bab es Silsileh (Gate of the Chain), and the northern Bab es Salam (Gate of Peace). At the bottom of the left jamb of the latter there is a massive stone with a marginal draft, the north end of which corresponds with the end of the great causeway arch beneath. The gate was built about 1492 a.d., and is ornamented with twisted columns, which were probably taken from some building erected by the Crusaders. In front of the gateway is a very beautiful fountain, which is supplied with water by the aqueduct from Solomon's Pools (see page 48). Beyond the Gate of the Chain is "Warren's Gate," named after Captain Warren, R.E., whose excavations have thrown so much light on the topographical features of ancient Jerusalem. The gate, which is unfortunately concealed by rubbish, led into a passage eighteen feet wide, and was, perhaps, the second gate which gave access to the suburbs from the west side of the Temple enclosure. A short distance to the north is Bab el Kattanin (Gate of the Cotton Merchants), a handsome Saracenic portal at the end of the old Cotton Bazaar, said to have been repaired in a.d. 1336. A flight of steps leads up to the gate, which tradition asserts to be the " Beautiful Gate" of the Temple, where Peter healed the lame man. From Wilson's Arch northwards to the Gate of the Seraglio the retaining wall can nowhere be seen ; but beneath the latter a portion has been found in a rock-hewn aqueduct, and near it Lieut. Conder, R.E., discovered the only masonry belonging to the original wall which is visible above the present surface of the Haram esh Sherif. This fragment is of great interest, as it has projecting pilasters and is similar in character to the masonry of the Haram wall, which encloses the last resting- place of the patriarchs at Hebron; it also shows that the outer walls of the Temple cloisters were built with pilasters, as represented in the restorations of Mr. Fergusson and the Count de Voglie. The north-west angle of the Haram esh Sherif has been cut out of the rock so as to leave escarpments from three to twenty-three feet high facing inwards on the north and west. There is here, in fact, a mass of rock, about one hundred feet thick, which is separated from the more northern hill of Bezetha by a ditch one hundred and sixty-five feet wide, and from twenty-six to thirty-three feet deep. Upon the rock stands a Turkish barrack, the successor, perhaps, of the Tower of Antonia, which Herod built to " secure and guard" the Temple. The tower, or castle, was of great extent, and played an important part during the siege of Jerusalem by Titus. It was on a rock fifty cubits high, which was covered from its foot with smooth stones, like the lower part of the Tower of David, so that "any one who would either try to get up or to go down it might not be able to hold his feet upon it." There were towers at each corner of the castle; that at the south-east was seventy cubits high, that it might overlook the Temple; and that at