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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 39
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 39. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2244.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 39. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2244

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 39, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2244.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 39
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_055.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 39 in the systematic and scientific exploration of Palestine. The arch is fifty feet long, and it had a span of forty-two feet. Portions of the three lower courses, in which are stones from nineteen to twenty-five feet long, alone remain, and these, from the appearance and position of the stones, evidently formed part of the original wall. The remaining stones of the arch were found lying, just as they fell, on a pavement of polished stone, more than forty feet beneath the surface of the ground, and near them a portion of the pier was also discovered. Under the pavement were the remains of an older arch, and lower still a remarkable rock- hewn channel for the conveyance of sweet water, which was in existence long before the Haram wall was built, and which may, perhaps, have been executed by order of King Hezekiah, who is known to have undertaken extensive works in connection with the water supply of Jerusalem. The position of " Robinson's Arch," and its dimensions, seem to indicate that it formed the first of a series of arches which supported a broad flight of steps leading from the Tyropoeon Valley to the centre aisle of the Royal Cloisters, " Stoa Basilica," which ran along the south wall of Herod's Temple. The arch may also mark the position of the fourth gate on the western side of the Temple, which Josephus says " led to the other city, where the road descended down into the valley by a great number of steps, and thence up again by the ascent." The "Stoa Basilica" was six hundred feet long and one hundred feet wide. It was divided into three aisles by one hundred and sixty-two Corinthian columns; and the centre aisle was one hundred feet, the side aisles each fifty feet, high. The roofs were adorned with deep sculptures in wood ; the high part in the middle was of polished stone; and the whole was finished off with much magnificence. The dimensions of the cloisters, in plan and section, are almost identical with those which York Cathedral would present if the transepts were taken off the sides and added to the ends ; and it would be difficult to imagine a finer effect than that which would be produced by a flight of steps fifty feet wide, carried on arches, and at one point raised fifty feet above the ground, leading up to such a noble pile of buildings. At a distance of two hundred and seventy feet from the south-west angle there is a closed gateway in the wall called the Gate of Mohammed, but generally known as " Barclay's Gate," from its fortunate discoverer, Dr. Barclay, an American missionary to Palestine. The gateway, which is evidently one of those that Josephus describes as leading from the western cloisters of the Temple to the suburbs of the city, is partly concealed by rubbish ; but excavations have shown that it was about eighteen feet ten inches wide and twenty-eight feet nine inches high. The lintel of the gate is one enormous stone, and its sill is no less than forty- nine feet nine inches above the rock. The approach was probably by a solid ramp of earth. Immediately behind the closed entrance there is now a mosque, in which is shown the ring to which Mohammed fastened his mysterious steed, Al Borak, on the occasion of his famous night journey; but the gateway formerly gave access to a vaulted passage, one of the approaches to Herod's Temple, which ran for sixty-nine feet in a direction at right angles to the wall, to a domed chamber or vestibule, and then, turning at right angles to the south,