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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 38
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 38. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 38. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2243

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 38, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 38
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_054.jpg
Transcript 38 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. holy places. Within its area was, according to tradition, the scene of Abraham's sacrifice (Gen. xxii. 3—14); and there was certainly the threshing floor which David bought from Araunah the Jebusite for fifty shekels of silver, and upon which he built an altar and offered burnt-offerings and peace-offerings. There, too, were the successive temples of Solomon, Zerubbabel, and Herod, the fortress of Antonia, and possibly the palace of Solomon; and there at the present day are the beautiful " Dome of the Rock " and the Mosque el Aksa, and the buildings which were once the home of the Knights Templars. All traces of the altar and of the temples of the Jews have long since disappeared, and their exact positions have for years been amongst the most fiercely contested points of Jerusalem topography. In the midst of all this ruin and desolation we can, however, feel that the hill is the same Mount Moriah round which cluster so many memories connected with Jewish history, with the earlier and later years of our Lord's life, and with the ministry of the Apostles, and that somewhere on its surface stood the building which excited the admiration and astonishment of the Queen of Sheba. The sacred ground, or Temple Platform, was enclosed and supported by massive retaining walls which are described by the Jewish historian in glowing terms. The enormous height of these walls and the magnificence of the masonry, almost justifying the description of Josephus, have been fully brought to light by the excavations undertaken by Captain (now Lieut.-Col.) Warren, R.E., for the Palestine Exploration Fund. At one corner the solid masonry rises to a height of one hundred and eighty feet, at another to a height of one hundred and thirty-eight feet, above the ground ; and at one point in the wall a great stone, thirty-eight feet nine inches long, four feet high, and ten feet deep, has been used at a height of eighty-five feet from the surface. Partially concealed as the walls are, here by ninety-five feet, there by sixty feet of rubbish, they still fill the traveller with admiration, and they must, when fresh from the builder's hands, have been the finest specimens of mural masonry in the world. It was with such walls before their eyes that the astonished Jews replied to our Lord, " Forty and six years was this Temple in building, and wilt thou rear it up in three days?" Above all this stood the Temple, of pure white glittering stone, covered in part with plates of gold, and surrounded by its courts and cloisters—a tout ensemble unsurpassed in magnificence by any temple of ancient times. One of the finest fragments of the ancient masonry is that at the south-west angle of the Haram esh Sherif, but, unfortunately, only a comparatively small portion of the older work is visible above ground. No mortar has been used in building the wall, and the great blocks of stone are so beautifully fitted together that a penknife can hardly be introduced between the joints. The faces of the stones are also finely " dressed," and round the margin of each runs a chiselled draft from two to five inches wide and about a quarter of an inch deep. Thirty-nine feet north of the south-west angle is the fragment of an old arch known as " Robinson's Arch " (see page 72), from the fact that it was first brought to notice by the eminent American, Dr. Robinson, who may well be looked upon as the foremost pioneer