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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 34
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 34. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 34. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 34, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_050.jpg
Transcript 34 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. here by weight to the makers of conserves and attar of roses. Hotel-keepers and servants from the various convents come here to make their bargains, and turbaned greengrocers and itinerant vendors of fruit come to buy their stock for the day. Soon the place is crowded and the bustle of buying and selling begins. No purchase is effected without a considerable amount of contention. The seller does not usually price the goods, but waits for an offer. The first offer is always absurdly low. The seller then names an exorbitantly high price. For instance, a dignified-looking shopkeeper, wearing a white turban, will offer three piastres for a large basket full of tomatoes. The girl in charge answers indignantly, " I will carry my tomatoes back to Siloam rather than take less than fifteen !"-—" O thou most greedy of the greedy, I will give no more than six!"—"O possessor of a tightly closed hand, I will not take less than twelve! How shall I buy the rice for my mother if I give away the fruits of her garden?" Finally she obtains seven and a half piastres for her tomatoes, and goes away perfectly satisfied, having argued with pertinacity for the half piastre. In an hour or two the market people disperse, and only a few retail sellers of fruit or of rude pottery remain. The illustration on page i gives an excellent idea of this place as it appears during the midday hours. As soon as the market is over the crowds increase in the bazaars. The narrow bazaar, of which a bird's-eye glimpse is shown on page 9, is called David Street. It opens into the market-place, and is paved with shallow steps as smooth as polished marble, descending towards the east, and generally littered with vegetable refuse. The shops on each side of the way are like large cupboards raised one or two feet from the ground. Within these recesses the shopkeepers sit at their ease gravely smoking in the midst of their wares. Damascus and Aleppo silks, Manchester prints and calicoes, Constantinople and Swiss muslin coloured veils, are displayed, and farther on pipes and hardware and dried fruits may be found. To the right are the bazaars leading to the Jewish quarter, and here most of the busiest workers congregate—tailors, embroiderers, tinsmiths, and shoemakers. The engraving on page 27 gives a good idea of a shoemaker's shop in one of the most narrow but busy bazaars in the city. It is close to an old archway overgrown with cactus and henbane. Two men are engaged at work. The wearer of the earrings, the master, is seated at a bench formed of a solid block of wood, and is vigorously using his mallet to beat into solidity a piece of leather for the sole of a shoe, while from the bowl of the neglected narghileh at his side a long curling column of smoke rises towards the dilapidated roof, and a lesser column issues from the mouthpiece which rests on the edge of the stall. The poor old short-sighted assistant squatting on the floor, and making a bench of his left leg, is patiently plying his awl and his waxed thread. The interior of the shop is fitted up with rude shelves, on which are ranged in rows heavy red shoes with pointed and turned-up toes and a few clumsy-looking lasts. Outside, on the large smooth round stones (which give a fair example of the usual kind of pavement on level ground in Jerusalem), may be seen the shoes of the occupants of the shop, two water-coolers of native pottery, and a roll of leather soaking in a bowl of water.