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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 29
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 29. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 29. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2234

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 29, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 29
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_045.jpg
Transcript JERUSALEM. 29 in the above-mentioned Turkish Barracks (see page 30). The second station is in the street below, where, at the foot of the Scala Santa, which led to the Judgment Hall, the cross was laid upon Christ. A few paces westward the street is spanned by the Ecce Homo Arch (see page 24), which marks the spot where Pilate brought Jesus forth "wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe," and presented Him to the multitude with the memorable words, "Behold the man!" (John xix. 5). The arch has all the appearance of a Roman triumphal arch of the time of Hadrian. It consists of a large central arch, with a smaller one on the north side which has been included in and forms the eastern termination of the Church of the Convent of the Sisters of Zion. Following the street downwards to the valley the third station is reached, a broken column near the Austrian Hospice which indicates the place where Christ fell under the cross. A little lower down is the house of Lazarus (see page 26), and the fourth station, where Christ met the Virgin Mary ; and then follow the house of Dives, with its handsome doorway, and the fifth station, where, our Lord having fallen for the second time, Simon of Cyrene took up the cross. A short ascent leads to the house of St. Veronica, the sixth station (see page 25). The road now ascends to the street which connects the Bazaars with the Damascus Gate, and here at the crossing is shown the seventh station, the so-called " Porta Judiciaria." The eighth station, where Christ addressed the women who accompanied him with the words, " Daughters of Jerusalem, weep not for me," is at the Monastery of St. Caralombos ; the ninth station, where He fell for the third time, is in front of the Coptic Convent; the tenth, within the church, marks the spot where He was undressed ; the eleventh where He was nailed to the cross; the twelfth where the cross was raised ; the thirteenth where He was taken down from the cross; and the fourteenth the Sepulchre itself. It is, perhaps, needless to add that the buildings along the Via Dolorosa are modern, and that the " stations " themselves have been moved from place to place in the city whenever necessity or convenience required their removal. Not far from the entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is the old gateway which formerly led into the pile of buildings belonging to the Knights of St. John, and which now, surmounted by the Prussian eagle, gives access to the ground presented by the Sultan to Prussia on the occasion of the visit of the Crown Prince to Jerusalem in 1869. The arch is semicircular, and when perfect must have been a beautiful specimen of twelfth-century work. Round the arch is a series of figures in stone, now much mutilated, but once representing the months. February is indicated by a man pruning, July by a reaper, August by a thresher, September by a grape-gatherer, &c. In the centre are the sun and moon—" Sol" a half figure holding a disc on high, " Luna " a female with a crescent. Above the arch is a cornice enriched with figures of lions and other animals, carved with great spirit, apparently by the same man who cut those in the cornice above the Chapel of the Egyptian Mary, near the door of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. In the close vicinity of the arch is the minaret of the Mosque of Omar (see page 35), erected 1417 a.d., and supposed to mark the place where Omar prayed when he entered Jerusalem after its capitulation. The mosque occupies the site of the