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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 20
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 20. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 20. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2225

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 20, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_036.jpg
Transcript 20 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. entrance to the Chapel of the Angels are gigantic wax candles, lighted only on certai occasions, and here the pilgrims take off their shoes before venturing to tread on th ground within. On either side of the entrance are two holes in the wall through \vh* h " Holy Fire" is given out at the Greek Easter; and in the centre of the chapel itself in marble and resting on a pedestal, is a portion of the stone that was rolled away fro 1 mouth of the Sepulchre. At the western end of the antechamber is a low doorway, the m tn of the tomb, over which is a bas-relief representing the figure of our Lord risino- from the ptp with the angel seated on the right-hand side, and the two Marys bringing incense and soic for the anointment on the left. The tomb chamber is entirely lined with marble, and from it roof hang forty-three lamps, of which thirteen belong to the Latins, thirteen to the Greeks thirteen to the Armenians, and four to the Copts. These lamps are kept burning day and night. The tomb is a raised bench two feet high, six feet four inches long, and three feet wide, covered by a marble slab which has a groove cut transversely across the centre. Above the tomb are three bas-reliefs in white marble representing the resurrection. A small chapel belonging to the Copts is attached to the western end of the shrine of the Holy Sepulchre, and nearly opposite to it a door leads from the Rotunda to the Chapel of the Syrians, and thence to the chamber which contains the tombs of Joseph and Nicodemus. The tombs are of the kind known as " kokim " (deep horizontal recesses), and there can be no reasonable doubt that the chamber is an ancient Jewish sepulchre containing, when perfect, six " kokim " for the reception of bodies. This would at first sight seem to indicate that the ground upon which the church is built lay without the walls of the ancient city; but we know- that some of the kings were buried in Jerusalem, and it is doubtful to what extent the Jews, before the Captivity, buried their dead outside the walls. At the time of the Roman siege one tomb at least lay within the walls, for it is referred to by Josephus as a well-known object. North of the shrine of the Holy Sepulchre the spot is pointed out where our Lord appeared to Mary Magdalene as a gardener, and a little beyond it is the Latin Chapel of the Apparition, which commemorates the appearance of Christ to his mother after the Resurrection. Behind the chapel is the Monastery of the Franciscans who live within the church, and in the adjacent sacristy are kept the sword and spurs of Godfrey de Bouillon. Directly east of the Sepulchre is the large Greek church, which occupies the site of the church of the Crusaders, destroyed by fire in 1808. It is profusely decorated, and contains a broken column said to mark the centre or navel of the earth. The church is separated from the aisles that surround it by a partition wall, through which a door leads to the two Greek chapels of the " Prison" and the " Bonds" of Christ. This portion of the church appears to have been little damaged by the fire. Passing along the north aisle, the first chapel belongs to the Greeks, and is dedicated to Longinus, the soldier who pierced Jesus' side with a spear, beyond this is a closed doorway, which once formed the eastern entrance to the church; an then the Armenian Chapel of the " Parting of the Vestments." Still further, at the east end 0 the south aisle, is the Greek Chapel of the " Crowning with Thorns," which contains t