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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 18
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 18. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2223.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 18. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2223

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 18, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2223.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_034.jpg
Transcript l8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the "Ointment Bearers "—originally the Chapel of the Trinity—where all marriag- baptisms were conducted, and which contains a very beautiful font; and the Ch 1 St. John, in the basement story of the great tower. The facade of the church occupie h entire northern side of the court. There are two doorways, one open and one closed b • 1 masonry of the Chapel of Calvary, and above each door is a window. The whole dates f the twelfth century, and forms part of the work of the Crusaders when they remodelled tl church. Some of the ornamentation is very similar to that which may be seen in m churches in Normandy at the present day, and a bas-relief over one of the doors, representin with much spirit the entrance of Christ into Jerusalem, is supposed to have been executed in France. The string courses above the doors and windows are partly made up of blocks of stone belonging to a very beautiful cornice of classical design, almost identical with that of the cornice of the Golden Gate in the east wall above the Haram esh Sherif. At the north-east corner of the court is a small chapel dedicated to St. Mary of Egypt. Above this chapel is another called the Chapel of the Agony, which is adjacent to Mount Calvary, and belongs to the Latins. In the north-east corner of the court is the fine Campanile or Bell Tower projecting from the facade, and once standing free, but now incorporated with the church. The tower was erected towards the close of the Latin occupation of Jerusalem, about 1170, and as late as 1678 consisted of five stories. There are at present only three stories, so that the striking effect which must have been produced by the tower when it was in its original state is quite lost. On entering the church we pass at once into the south transept of the Church of the Crusaders, which, in consequence of the changes made in 1808, has now the appearance of a vestibule. Here, on the left-hand side, some members of the Moslem family which has charge of the keys will always be found seated when the church is open ; and the visitor has directly in front of him the " Stone of Unction," which is said to mark the spot on which our Lord's body was laid when it was anointed after having been taken down from the cross. The stone, a large slab of limestone, is raised a few inches above the level of the floor, and is said to have been placed in its present position when the church was rebuilt. A few paces to the left of the stone is the spot where the Virgin Mary and the other women stood when the body of Christ was anointed, and beyond it lies the Rotunda, which is sixty-seven feet in diameter. The Rotunda formerly had twelve large columns which supported the dome, but there are now eighteen piers which carry a clerestory and a dome open at the top. A vaulted aisle with three apses, now walled up and divided into chambers, runs round the western hall 0 the Rotunda. In the centre is the Shrine of the Holy Sepulchre (see page 17), built, in the very worst taste, of the ruddy coloured limestone known at Jerusalem as " Santa Croce " marble, building is about twenty-six feet long and eighteen feet wide. Its western end is polygona shape, its eastern, square; and the interior is divided into two chapels, one on the east, kno the Chapel of the Angels, the other containing the Sepulchre of Christ. In front 0 as