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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 14
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 14. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2219.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 14. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2219

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 14, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2219.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_030.jpg
Transcript PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. fever and sickness. The Church of St. John the Baptist, or " Forerunner," has been built above a much older church, which is half-filled with rubbish, but in a good state of preservation. The floor of this old church is twenty-five feet below the present level of the " Street of the Christians "—a good proof of the great accumulation of rubbish in this part of the city. At Easter time Christian Street is thronged with pilgrims passing to and fro, or making purchases at the numerous shops, and presents an appearance of life and animation which it is far from possessing during the autumn and winter months. On the left-hand side of the street, near the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, is the great Greek Monastery, celebrated for the library and manuscripts which it contains. Five churches—of which the oldest is that of St. Thecla —are included in the monastery, and there is considerable accommodation for the monks and for pilgrims who visit Jerusalem. On the right-hand side of the street a narrow passage and flight of steps lead down to the courtyard in front of the entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (see page 16). The open court is the favourite resort of pedlars from Bethlehem, who expose their wares for sale on the pavement, and drive a thriving trade in rosaries, mother-of-pearl ornaments, olive-wood trinkets, and other small articles, which the pilgrims purchase as mementoes of their visit to the Holy City. A discussion of the many difficult questions connected with the site of the Holy Sepulchre would be beyond the scope of the present work; it will be sufficient here to state briefly the nature of the theories which have been advanced, and to give a slight sketch of the history of the church. The three principal theories are :—F'irst, that the Sepulchre of our Lord was beneath the " Sakhra" or Rock in the Haram esh Sherif, and that the noble building above it, the " Dome of the Rock," is the Church of the Resurrection erected by the Emperor Constantine in the fourth century. According to this theory, of which Mr. James. Fergusson is the well-known author and able exponent, the tradition relating to the site of the sepulchre was transferred to the present tomb in the eleventh century. Second, that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre occupies the ground once covered by the churches of Constantine, and that it contains within its walls the tomb of Christ. Third, that the true sepulchre was to the north of the city without the present walls, and was never found, but that the present " Holy Sepulchre" is the tomb "miraculously discovered" by Constantine, and that over which he built his church. The first question that arises is whether Constantine really found the " new sepulchre wherein was never man yet laid," which Joseph of Arimathsea " had hewn out in the rock" in his own garden. What is historically certain is that Constantine erected on the "discovered ground" a magnificent group of buildings, which were completed and dedicated in 335 a.d. In 614 a.d., when the Persians captured Jerusalem, the Great Basilica, or Martyrion, was wholly or partially destroyed by fire, but it was rebuilt about 626 a.d. by Modestus, Superior of the Monastery of Theodosius. The buildings, which are fully described by a French bishop, Arculf, who saw them about 700 a.d., then consisted of the Anastasis, or Church of the Resurrection, which contained the Holy Sepulchre; the Basilica, or Martyrion, a five-aisled